The Coffee Thread

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by Goobers, May 9, 2011.

  1. eilsel

    eilsel Member

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    Weight based would save having to weigh the grinds prior to pulling the shot but then the 270 wi model would be needed which is more expensive. At the end of the day it’s a personal choice dependant on your finances.
     
  2. underskore

    underskore Member

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    weight based by far (if you're that pedantic and have the $)
    the time based grinder in my barista pro seems to have a decent amount of variance between a full and low hopper

    could be the weight or the time out of bag for the beans but either way variance is variance
     
  3. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

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    Sorry - didn't see this the other day.

    One thing I've learned after multiple grinder upgrades is - buy the best you can afford. If you need to stretch a little, just do it and cry later. You'll be thankful down the track.

    Also, at this 'low-end' - spending as much or more than your machine is recommended given the grinder will make a bigger impact overall.

    So it really comes down to your budget, and whether you want a single-dose or grind on demand workflow (i.e. put in the right amount of beans each time, or have a hopper of beans sitting ready ready to go all the time).

    From a bang for buck perspective, have a look at:

    - Baratza Sette 270 ($450)

    Pros: Good value, conical grinder with minimal retention, fast grinding and super easy grind size adjustment.
    Cons: Loud AF. Cheaply built (but gets the job done). Has a tendency to drift in grind size.

    Note: Don't get the 270W which has the built in scales. It's an extra $150 - $200 and it's just not worth the extra for a set of inbuilt scales.

    - Eureka Mignon Specialita 55 ($850)

    Pros: Real step up in quality (both build and burrs). Larger burrs (and flat vs conical if that matters to you). Quiet. More consistent grind size. Stepless adjustment.
    Cons: Ugly (IMHO but that's personal), moderate retention (3 - 5g).

    - Niche Zero ($1000)

    Pros: Single-dosing king for the price. Great quality build. Great quality larger burrs (it uses Kony Mazzer conical burrs). Quiet. Easy adjustment. 0.1g retention. Looks awesome (again IMHO)
    Cons: Availability can de difficult but it's improved a lot recently.


    My honest advice would be to pick between the Specialita and Niche Zero. I've had the Sette 270, and while it does a good job, I 100% guarantee you'll be looking to upgrade within a year or two. So you may as well spend a bit extra now.

    Keep in mind that there are about 100 grinders in the under $1,000 range - I've just called out the ones I'm familiar with and that have a well-known good reputation in the community.

    Also, if you really want bang for buck - look for slightly used grinders on places like the Coffeesnob forums and Jet Black Espresso.
     
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  4. Sledge

    Sledge Member

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    Yes that is damn ugly lol..
    reviews say they're excellent...

    Thanks for the info!
     
    Last edited: Jun 7, 2021
  5. Phalanx

    Phalanx Member

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    question on the grinder front, I'm a cheap arse, I have a basic delonghi machine and a $12 kmart blade grinder or a hand grinder I got from somewhere.

    I've been thinking about buying a Timemore C2 since it fits within my cheaparse budget and I'd like to minimise counter space use, but should I just get a breville smart grinder (I've been keeping an eye out for a $200 sale) if I go electric? Or will something like this cheapo Bodum be enough to see significant improvements in taste?

    Depending on what the working from home front looks like going forward I'll splash out eventually, but for now I'm not sure what's what.
     
  6. miicah

    miicah Member

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    For the price, the timemore is actually amazing. I bought one for work for Aeropress/V60 and it is night and day over my old Hario slim grinder (which wasn't bad after the sticky tape mod).

    Breville Smart Grinder, Baratza Encore and those low end grinders are "okay" for espresso, especially if you have a cheap/weak machine that can't push a proper espresso grind anyway.

    Next step up would be upgrading your machine. What one is it out of curiosity? I know of a basic Delonghi that is actually quite good for the money.
     
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  7. Phalanx

    Phalanx Member

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    The EC685M Dedica, and I've been surprised at how good it is. I bought an unpressurised basket too but with the grind being so crappy it didn't really work.

    It's looking like I move into a new team as of Monday and will find out whether the expectation is office or home for the foreseeable future, so maybe I'll wait until then and upgrade both at once. Reality is, I make 1-2 coffees a week at home when I work in the office full time so going and dropping $2k on coffee equipment seems excessive in my case.

    A V60 and a timemore might actually be a pretty good option. At worst I could use them in the office and it's at least a huge upgrade over my blade grinder for espresso (even if it's not the best).
     
  8. miicah

    miicah Member

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    Yep you're 90% of the way there really. The timemore CAN grind espresso, but it will take a while.

    At the stage you're at, I would recommend the Rancilio rocky, Sette 270 or (what I bought) the Eureka Mignon.

    Otherwise, yeah grab a gooseneck, V60 and Timemore with some good quality light roast and go nuts.
     
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  9. Lardman

    Lardman Member

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    I've got a BDB, next upgrade is probably a Lelit Bianca + a single dose grinder. Niche or the Lagom P64
     
  10. Sledge

    Sledge Member

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    How do these twin boiler machines cope with starting up once or twice a day, just for 2 coffees at a time?
    Are they fine? Or should they really be left on all the time?

    I'm thinking once i've sold the current auto machine i'll get the BDB (maybe?) and Sette 270 (i'll weigh what i want and just put that through each time)
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2021
  11. h2oxide

    h2oxide Member

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    Keep your eye out for the upcoming Eureka single dose grinder. Should be at least as good as the Zero whilst costing less.
     
  12. Sledge

    Sledge Member

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    What did this actually mean?
    It only does enough for a single shot?
    Or can do enough for a double shot as well?
    Or it just means it's not bulk grinding into a container?
     
  13. h2oxide

    h2oxide Member

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    There's generally no bean hopper or its tiny; weigh the beans for a single coffee and pop em in the grinder.

    EDIT Oh and very low/non-existent retention
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2021
  14. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

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    Depends on the style of machine.

    One of the big advantages that thermoblock machines (like the BDB) have over the traditional style E61 group head machines (like the fancy looking Italian ones you see) is the fast warm up. A BDB will be ready to brew from turn on in under 3 minutes. A dual-boiler E61 will often take 20 - 30 minutes to completely warm through which is a giant pain in the ass. Most of them also can't be scheduled to turn on at set time so they're ready when you want your coffee.

    As for leaving them on - you mostly can't. The majority of machines will automatically turn themselves off after a set time without use.

    Wouldn't get too excited. It's literally just a Eureka Mignon tilted 15 degrees, with a smaller hopper. Won't produce any different results than the existing grinder (which is great).
     
    Last edited: Jun 14, 2021
  15. h2oxide

    h2oxide Member

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    That's exactly the reason to be excited. Cheaper and arguably better (and more available) than the Niche if you prefer flat burrs.
     
  16. h2oxide

    h2oxide Member

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    I'm neither for or against E61 group heads, but this can be easily solved by using some kind of mains timer switch.
     
  17. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

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    Why would you think that it'll be cheaper than the NZ?

    I'll tell you now that there is precisely zero chance it'll be cheaper than the Niche Zero. It's essentially a Eureka Mignon XL, tilted, with some fancy wooden accents and bellows. The XL sells for $1350. I'd expect this to attract a small premium, so guessing it'll come in around $1400 - $1500.
     
  18. h2oxide

    h2oxide Member

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    Didn't know it was based off the XL; I recall seeing $850 USD somewhere although I may be confusing this with the X54 as I've been looking at a lot of grinders lately.
     
  19. Lardman

    Lardman Member

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    Honestly, space is also a concern too - I like having a little bit of aesthetic in my kitchen :)

    Weber workshops have a single doser too that's gonna be interesting
     
  20. cbwolf

    cbwolf Member

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    Their grinders tend to be pretty big (i.e. the EG1).

    The Key (I assume the one you're referring to) looks interesting, but also will be around $3k. I don't really see the value there to be honest.

    Sure it'll come with massive 83mm conical burrs, but one of the best parts of a conical burr set is they generate far less heat than flat burrs, so realistically the difference between 83mm burrs and something like the 64mm conical burrs in the NZ is going to be nothing.

    If I were to buy another grinder it would most likely be the Lagom P100. 98mm flat burrs and built to amazing standards (and looks pretty cool IMHO).
     

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