The 'Glassy and Glowy Clock' thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by Symon, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. @rt

    @rt Member

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    Oh my, I hope you find a way to make that monster last!
    Have you ever heard of a thing called component dress?
    I noticed a few resistor tolerance bands facing different directions!!!
     
  2. @rt

    @rt Member

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    Hi dakiller, and welcome v8ltd :)
    I didn't think reverse psychology could be such an effective way to motivate others.

    [​IMG]

    I'll bet you and your mate couldn't get together, and build the worlds first spark gap clock,
    remembering that persistence of vision exists, using no more than six electrodes per digit.
     
  3. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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  4. v8ltd

    v8ltd Member

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    Thanks for the comments guys! And thanks Daniel for the idea! Was a real challenge to make but well worth it in the end, and it keeps perfect time due to it running of the mains 50 Hz.

    One day when I finish it I will post photos of my 2.5" PWM RGB LED Hard drive clock which was working until the ceramic platter shattered...

    I am also working on another point to point project to top off the clock, once that is done and if it works I will share it on here as well.

    Thanks,
    Gil

    Oh and the response I received from the creator of the transistor clock when I e-mailed him the pics:

    Holy......

    I'm speechless.........

    What in the world..........

    You have made an amazing piece of art. May I show it on my hall-of-fame page?

    Thanks for sharing it with me.

    Keith
     
  5. Technics

    Technics Member

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    That is one amazing piece of work. I've seen a few smaller scale designes built free form in a sort of sculptural way but never on this scale. I tend to design a PCB before I even pick up a soldering iron these days becuase the cost is so low and you can make the next unit very easily. I note the string below the display. Is it still hanging on a wall somewhere? And how long did that monster take you to build?
     
  6. Technics

    Technics Member

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    Been working on a James Brown inspired alarm clock.

    Your inspiration to make the clock - James Brown, being stuck in temporary accommodation while moving countries and finding weird displays on eBay.
    Type of display - Planar EL160.80.38-SM1 electroluminescent touch screen display (as used in the Sun StorEdge A5000/A5100 disk array)
    How do you set the time - Touch screen menus
    Microcontroller used - Atmel ATMEGA328P
    Programming language used - C
    RTC clock chip (if used) - DS3231
    Any other features or information - Designed a custom PCB in Eagle and sent it off. Waited for the boards to arrive from China... Soldered everything up. Found some sample code for the screen on the interwebs (here and here). Spent two days debugging the severe display flicker during updates that occurred when using said code (It turns out that in the Japanese to English translation of the SED1335 datasheet some of the subtle nuances regarding the use of the busy flag were lost. Not the first time I've had this type of experience). Found out that the Atmel AVR is incapable of triggering on an external interrupt when the pulse you're looking for is significantly shorter than a clock cycle (as is the case for the touch screen interrupt signal). But eventually got it to all work. The firmware is still a work in progress but the display/touch screen drivers are solid and the screen can be updated fast without glitching. Next step is to get the separate sound playback board for the alarm done.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Tinian likes this.
  7. C-BuZz

    C-BuZz Member

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    Man this is friggin sweet as :thumbup: Love it.
     
  8. @rt

    @rt Member

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    Uncanny, looks like a clock I did for Sony PSP.
    I can't tell the size of the screen you're using there...
     
  9. Technics

    Technics Member

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    The diagonal of the active area is roughly 70mm. So it's not massive but enough to be read easily from across the room when the time is full screen. Do you have any pics of the PSP clock?
     
  10. @rt

    @rt Member

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    It could do a lot of colours/patterns, just happens that yellow was the default
    so memories come back :D
    https://www.google.com.au/search?q=...a1iQerzYCgDQ&ved=0CAkQ_AUoAQ&biw=1456&bih=709

    Like the transparency one with Claudia Schiffer? :D


     
  11. Technics

    Technics Member

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    That looks pretty sweet. I'm surprised it's even possible to write software for Sony consoles and portables with all the copy protection paranoia from them.

    Unfortunately with the EL display yellow is the only colour choice. Also being 1 bit per pixel they're either fully on of off so it's bit limiting when designing the GUI. Then there's the fact that display RAM can only be updated during the horizontal "retrace" when it isn't used by the display controller. That significantly limits frame rate for any animation. However, it should be possible to do the rolling effect because there is hardware support for horizontal and vertical scrolling of separate bit planes in the controller.
     
  12. @rt

    @rt Member

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    There was originally some dicking around with the PSP, a process like jailbreaking iPhones,
    but it's all open now because apparently they can write signed executables.

    I kept one around because it is a nice way to get something on a colour display,
    and a high level platform. Could be useful again for something.
     
  13. ^catalyst

    ^catalyst Member

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    Yeah Technics, I'll take one mate!
     
  14. Aetherone

    Aetherone Member

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    Is pvelectronics still the place to go for kits?
     
  15. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    I think so. A colleage of mine got one a few weeks ago. They seem to be one of the more reasonably priced kits out there.
     
  16. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Alright got my glassy glowy clock built.

    Your inspiration to make the clock -
    Stein Gate and this thread
    Type of display - Nixie In-12
    How do you set the time - Manual
    Microcontroller used - PIC16F1956
    Programming language used - Not english!
    RTC clock chip (if used) - None!
    Any other features or information - http://www.pvelectronics.co.uk/index.php?main_page=product_info&cPath=1&products_id=140

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I also bought this kit. But first one the chip died or something and whole thing went up in smoke. 2nd PCB worked but half the tubes didn't light up and the ones that did light up were a bit weird. Only works sporatically. So I just turned it off and wrote it off as a learning experience. :upset:
     
    Last edited: Jan 28, 2014
  17. Rt!

    Rt! Member

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    What a clock envy inducing thread!
     
  18. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    It uses a PIC16F1956 microcontroller, and doesn't use a RTC.
     
  19. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Well, there we go. :D
     
  20. @rt

    @rt Member

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    Yeah that doesn't necessarily lead to the conclusion that the fault was with the kit constructor.
    I see (or think I see) you care about component dress with resistor tolerance bands facing down and all.

    You should be able to change positions of the nixie tubes to test and save the good ones I suppose.


     

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