The 'Glassy and Glowy Clock' thread

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by Symon, Feb 19, 2013.

  1. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    Already did mate. I know exactly which ones are working which ones are dead. I keep the resistors facing the same direction for easy diagnostics down the track. Might go back and visit it again later. Those Z5600 tubes are too expensive to keep testing.
     
  2. pippin88

    pippin88 Member

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    My word clock

    Your inspiration to make the clock - saw some cool ones online. Made this one for my missus' birthday (presents are a great excuse for prolonged amounts of time spent on toys / in the shed)
    Type of display - 6x16 LED (96 LEDs) matrix, driven by 2x MAX7219
    How do you set the time - Buttons recessed on right side - hold set to open time set, then up, down to adjust hours, mins, days, months etc, confirming each entry with press of set button
    Microcontroller used - Arduino Pro Mini
    Programming language used - C++
    RTC clock chip (if used) - DS3231
    Any other features or information - Does scrolling messages (including birthdays etc). Displays date and temperature once each hour.

    Sorry for crappy pictures - looks better in real life

    Front is laser cut dark blue picture framing matte with normal white A4 paper behind for diffusion.
    LEDs are 5mm diffused white, from ebay. ~$5 for 100. First bunch of LEDs I bought (different ones) had ~10% failure rate, but these ones seem good (0 failures of 100)
    LEDs are held in an MDF board with pockets routed in for each letter (acts as baffles to separate each letter).
    Outside is Kauri pine, 42mm thick.

    [​IMG]

    Back is just 3mm MDF
    [​IMG]

    Scrolling:
    [​IMG]

    Fun project, included PCB design, coding, woodwork.
     
  3. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    Nice, I've got a similar watch face on my pebble 'fuzzy time'. blows people away.
     
  4. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    That is awesome, thanks for sharing.
     
  5. toje

    toje Member

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    You assembled it,
     
  6. pippin88

    pippin88 Member

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    ? Not sure what you mean?
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    I think he is implying you bought it as a kit.
     
  8. Technics

    Technics Member

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    I was under the impression it was made it from scratch. Hence the need for PCB design and woodwork. It's very nicely designed and executed IMHO. Electronics is one thing. Mechanical design is another. Doing both well is a quite a challenge. :thumbup:
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    Agreed.

    I don't think it is a kit either, but a very nicely done DIY one from scratch. I don't think any commercial kits would bother to use an arduino.
     
  10. pippin88

    pippin88 Member

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    Yep, made from scratch.

    Designed PCB in fritzing based on datasheets and some tutorials for similar projects.
    Got PCB made by itead. Very happy with them, got 12 PCBs for $22 delivered. I made two errors on the design, one just in silkscreen (capacitor orientation) and a bigger error where I used a standard width package for the DS3231 (it's a wide chip). Did the dodgy and bent the pins down and it just fits, difficult to solder it though.

    Clock face is laser cut on my DIY laser cutter. Font is pyrion 2 from memory, which I then modified into a stencil font for the necessary letters.

    Wood body is 42mm Kauri. It's actually just a shell of sorts, with the LED matrix in MDF with pockets routed. The kauri is cut from the front, with a 3mm deep pocket for the face, then a slightly smaller area all the way through, the mdf sits this against the face. Then I flip it over and pocket out the back so the back plate sits flush.
    Next one I do I will do differently. I'll do all the routing from the back, with a larger pocket. This will be easier and mean the clock face is held flat by the LED matrix pushing behind. It will also mean the edge size and finish of the clock face will not need to be precise because it will be hidden.
     
    Last edited: Feb 27, 2014
  11. RyoSaeba

    RyoSaeba Member

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    That is awesome! :thumbup: The clock looks great mate. Good job. :D
     
  12. kombiman

    kombiman Dis-Member

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    Dude...


    I mean dude!

    That is impressive! You could make a decent side income selling those if you get your workflow sorted to make it as smooth as possible! I bet wife is happy!
     
  13. Supplanter

    Supplanter Member

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  14. Mathuisella

    Mathuisella Member

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    that world clock is awesome. any chance of a time lapse recording to see it in action ?
     
  15. @rt

    @rt Member

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    I might have missed something, but can't see an input method.. Unless you have to start it at 12:00 or something like that.
     
  16. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    You use magnets to operate reed switches. The 12VAC power goes in the back.
     
  17. @rt

    @rt Member

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    It’s a shame neither of the project have video, even though the only difference with the first one is you’d see a normal clock display.
     
  18. anark1

    anark1 Member

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  19. Technics

    Technics Member

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    They seem to be well designed and they have a good rep. I assume you've done some soldering before? If so you should be okay. They are multiplexed designs which reduces the number of connections required. Without any soldering experience I'd do some simpler kits first.

    For the actual tubes I prefer Euro or US tubes to the Russian ones. They are made more accurately and last virtually forever. They tend to have finer anode screen/mesh in front of the digits that helps with readability and angle of view. I'd be willing to pony up the extra for the ZM1210 tubes considering the amount of work you will put into building the thing. I have a box of 50 IN-8's and I'm just not a huge fan so haven't used them yet. IMO the Russian stuff is functional but not beautiful.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    Symon

    Symon (Plugging your Socket)

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    I've built a few of the PV Electronics kits and I found them really well designed and simple to build. I recommend the QT based kits as they make it really easy to replace a tube if one fails or you happen to solder it in incorrectly. I built a SixNix kit for a relative and am now regretting it, I've had two tube failures on that clock, and they aren't easy to replace as they are directly soldered onto the main board.
     

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