The Great Big NBN Sticky Thread

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Akh-Horus, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. caspian

    caspian Member

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    chances are that it is working fine from NBN's point of view. that the phone works is a pretty good indication of that. all they do is provide a circuit that can carry data.

    send me some details of the service if you want and I will take a look.
     
  2. caspian

    caspian Member

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    r8response - thanks for the PM.

    if the correct MAC can be seen on your port then physical connectivity to your premises is fine. there are no issues with the copper line, it's running quite well.

    I can do end to end continuity tests across the circuit, and I can pump TC-4 tagged synthetic traffic though it as as well. there's been significant historical traffic flow in the TC-4 data channel, and all of the programming is as it should be.

    far from hand balling, Telstra have reported any issue with the service *once* on 6 March - as a no sync problem! :rolleyes: the ticket was actioned in 13 minutes and unsurprisingly resolved as all tests passed, including some simple dataflow checks that went above and beyond the reported issue (probably because the operator wondered WTF they were on about). Telstra accepted the resolution without further comment or action as "self resolved".

    whatever the issue is, it appears to be inside Telstra's network.
     
  3. banshee

    banshee Member

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    Undertrained employee who doesn't know that VOIP phones use data, & figured that the modem wasn't connecting but the POTS was working, on an NBN link...?
     
  4. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I have little doubt re the undertrained employee, but there is no POTS associated with this service. the only voice is via VoIP.
     
  5. r8response

    r8response Member

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    Fortunately its not my service, just someone who has been dicked around with by Telstra since January. Apart from the AVC, the other info is all 2nd hand.
     
  6. caspian

    caspian Member

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    to revisit an old post - yep.
     
  7. chip

    chip Member

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    So TC-2 FTTN speeds greater than 20Mbit may be on the cards?
     
    Last edited: Mar 20, 2019
  8. caspian

    caspian Member

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    you've been able to get 20Mbps TC-2 for some time now.

    whether >20Mbps is made available will depend on the IT costs of doing so (considerable), versus the number of services which are likely to want it, times those that can carry it.
     
  9. Doc-of-FC

    Doc-of-FC Member

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    caspian obviously we're not privy to the behind the curtain pricing on the delivery of NBN (thank you Conroy and it'll turn a profit) and honestly I don't mind as it returns great value for money.

    I see additional price corrections needed for 50/20 (lower socio economic benefits / possible government subsidy / elderly), although I see a critical mass tipping point for 100/40 at ~$55 a month wholesale with current RSP margins.

    I see my incumbent ISP charging the same margin on 50 and 100 plans, based on the respective $45 and $65 wholesale price points, GST aside, so I wonder, where do you see the business model in 5 years time? I ponder the need for separate CVC charging, instead loading it onto the AVC entirely based on (maybe) a sliding scale, ISP's are commodity margins (Telstra excluded ;)) and as bandwidth demands continue to increase and the future potential of UHD-TV on TC-4 (hell why even bother with terrestrial transmission) I'm not seeing the NBN live much longer than 10 years without significant upgrades, am I looking at this wrong?
     
  10. chip

    chip Member

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    As a business customer, the larger FTTN footprint and the cost/slow turnaround of the NBN technology change program means that I'm often looking at going with someone other than NBN. We can't be the only people in this situation, which must be eating away at NBN business connection revenues. Without the cream from business users, that target ARPU has got to be shaky as low-end residential sales get more competition from 4G & fixed wireless.

    We're 100% rural/remote, and I love it when we set up an office in a FTTP area. It's so fucking easy compared to pissing around with all the problems we find with lead-ins, MDFs, IDFs etc with our FTTN locations.
     
    Last edited: Mar 21, 2019
  11. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I really have not spent much time looking at the business side of the plan in any detail. it largely is what it is, and any substantive change will need to come from government level.

    I do believe the majority of complaints over CVC pricing are misplaced, on two grounds - it's very analogous to the AGVC pricing separate to a per-service cost that Telstra has levied for as long as I can remember; and under the government's current expectations of operational profitability, the cost would simply have to be relocated elsewhere. it may be convenient for the industry to focus on CVC as a scapegoat, but if the price was transferred into AVC service charges, nothing has changed overall. any overall reduction in service cost can only come from the government either writing down the capital investment in the project, or committing to lower profitability.

    much of the industry complaints about costs also appear to be driven by their clinging to the legacy price point of ADSL services; no doubt that is in turn a flow-on effect of what consumers would like to pay, but everything else in the world has increased in price over time from cars to hamburgers to movie tickets; why is there any expectation that internet access prices would stand still, let alone while a massive investment in the network is taking place?

    no doubt different segments of the network will require an upgrade in the future, but the local freeway I use to get to work is a running joke for spending more of the last decade under one upgrade or another; why didn't they just built what was required from the outset?
     
  12. renren

    renren Member

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    *sigh* after over more than a week without Internet, Optus was finally able to get it working... I was hoping to leave them for another ISP but after speaking to the NBN co dude who was in the pit outside my house I don't think it's worth it.
    My house is 1100m+ from the node. That's quite shit, and changing ISP won't fix that. My line is capable of a max of 20Mbps (but I actually see 12). Guess we're moving if I want fast Internet.
    Worst thing is that I lived FURTHER OUT OF TOWN and got 100/40 no worries. What a mess.
     
  13. caspian

    caspian Member

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    that's physics for you.

    so why couldn't Optus tell you that, when they have full access to information from NBN that provides guidance on what sorts of speeds your line can achieve? every ISP has the same level of access, and many can and do use it every day.
     
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  14. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    This pretty much summarises so many people's wide-area networking gripes :p
     
  15. renren

    renren Member

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    Being closer to the centre of town = worse internet? Physics sure.
    They told me 90 when I moved in, then 43 last week when the issues started, and now its 20 from the man in the pit. Telstra wasn't any better when I was with them.
    Getting any sort of information has proven to be very painful, to say the least. (I've been actively trying since Feb 7 to get information about this - as per you telling me to).
     
  16. caspian

    caspian Member

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    with all due respect, why is there any expectation that geographical location to the centre of town would equal better internet?

    if they told you 90, yet it's been established that you are >1100m from the node, then the answer is simple. they didn't use the tools made available to them, and have bullshitted you.
     
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  17. renren

    renren Member

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    Call it anecdotal if you wish, but in most places that aren't cities the exchange is located close to the center of town. This is in the country, where it is generally accepted that being closer to the center of town results in faster internet.
    Lord alone knows where the node sits that I'm connected to (other than being 1100 meters away, apparently). Is it near the exchange? Looking at the map, probably! No way to find out for a lowly peon like me though, apparently.
    There a closer ones, I know that much.

    I know I've been bullshitted, that's why I'm salty. This wonderful NBN of ours where it's a crapshoot as to what speed we'll get, and there's no way to find out until you actually move in.
    Worse is knowing that this was the best they could come up with. This was the upgrade from ADSL2+....... Went from ADSL2+ speeds to ADSL2+ speeds and paid a stack of money for it.

    Sitting in my little old house 50m away from cows netted me 100/40, yet sitting in suburbia getting 12/3 on a good day (or like the last week, where it just decided not to work at ALL).

    I want my wife to be able to stream Netflix at 4k to make use of the 4k TV. I want to watch 1440p youtube on my computer at the same time, maybe download a game at the same time and not have it take 3 days. Host my servers like I was previously.
    It's all superficial in the end, but I'm annoyed that I could do it, and now I can't. Could I do it one block over, do they have a different node that's closer? Well.... there's a node less than 200m away on the corner, who the bloody hell is connected to that?!

    Sorry, not angry at you, I'm just disappointed in the whole thing.
     
  18. Doc-of-FC

    Doc-of-FC Member

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    In your case it might be worth looking at another thread in N,T&I about a 4g hookup. Excellent results can be had with a little bit of homework.
     
  19. caspian

    caspian Member

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    that hasn't been the case for about 20 years since Telstra started introducing active streetside cabinets. nodes are no different, it's distance to the node that counts, and in the NBN there isn't even an exchange at all.

    that is absolutely not the case. as I have said several times now, your ISP has been provided with tools for this precise reason and use. why didn't they use them?

    that node serves a different pillar. your house doesn't connect to that pillar, and there's no way to make it do so. that's the way Telstra designed and built the network decades ago.
     
  20. bryn

    bryn Member

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    Telstra & optus are the two worst providers- they are rubbish to deal with and have no idea what they are talking about. Not that any of the RSPs can help make your line shorter, but ABB or Superloop would have told you what was going on, have better customer service, better evening speeds and no bullshit.
     

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