The Great Big NBN Sticky Thread

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Akh-Horus, Dec 21, 2016.

  1. caspian

    caspian Member

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    just a small, environmentally hardened DSLAM. the unit itself is the finned component closest to the camera operator. the rest is power supply and mini copper MDF.

    [​IMG]

    the housing is not very big, here's one with a Telstra pillar for scale. (this isn't an NBN micronode, but the housing is commercially available and used for a lot of things.) https://goo.gl/maps/Hvex5h84a9bVWzqW9
     
  2. romp

    romp Member

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    Wow - thanks for the info. Very interesting and greatly appreciated mate. Probably a difficult question (and perhaps one that you can't answer for confidentiality reasons) but I've always been curious why they deployed the node so far away. It didn't make much sense to me as the main node is very close to another main node. I thought they would've spaced them out especially as where the micronode is now, there was a Telstra CMUX which I'm pretty sure is quite similar to a node. It meant that I got blazing ADSL2+ sync speeds - I used to sync around 22mbps.

    Lovely street. Especially the raised section near the park and Belah Pl - great view. Fond memories of carrying my daughter and walking up the hill to the park when she was a baby. She's turning 11 this year - time flies :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 4, 2020
  3. romp

    romp Member

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    Micronodes only service approximately 42 houses/connections - is that correct? Shame for some houses in my estate - they would've missed out as there's a bit over 50.
     
  4. millsy

    millsy Member

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    Ahh that does ring a bell, is it common for them to be used to upgrade poor FTTN connections?
     
  5. caspian

    caspian Member

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    romp and millsy - they only have 48 ports, but in practice serve less customers than that - the median is about 20. they tend to be deployed as "infill" on the fringes of coverage areas, at the end of cable runs, or where there are a few long lines that need "shortening" by moving the DSLAM closer. they're also used fairly extensively in small MDUs.

    good question. I've been staring at the design for the last 30 minutes trying to figure out what they were smoking at the time, this is as close as I can come.

    there's a Telstra CMUX with an adjunct ISAM installed in the nature reserve opposite #13. the CMUX supplies voice, the ISAM does the DSL. these cabinets are a departure from normal, in that the cabinet *also* serves as a copper pillar, which is why they say P48 on them. this causes a problem, because normally NBN take ownership of the pillar and the copper past it. that can't happen in this case - there no pillar, and Telstra are not passing on their active cabinet. so what they did is extend cabling back to where the node is located on Young Rd. that has led to some long line lengths, although they are nowhere near the 1800m you mention - maybe 1100m at most.

    obviously it does impact performance though, and design is done on the expectation of copper in fair condition - it has to be done before NBN actually gets its hands on the copper asset - so if there are any issues with the copper, they have to be dealt with reactively. that also includes performance projections post-coexistence - removal of the coexistence settings boosts performance, but it also comes with an uplift in the minimum performance SLAs. so there's a potential for a line that's got acceptable performance now to be unacceptable post coexistence, and there's a proactive maintenance program to address that situation. there are a range of possible outcomes, from simply fixing the copper fault, to installing a new copper segment if that's cost effective, to splitting the node coverage area and installing a new micronode which both bypasses damage and shortens the line length (what I think has been your outcome) to potentially changing the deployed technology type for part of the area.

    [edit - spelling]
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
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  6. romp

    romp Member

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    Again, thanks for a stellar reply. I'm quite far from the Young Rode node - I'm not central Wedgetail Circuit but rather right up the back, I don't want to post my exact address (as everyone can read it here) but I guess I'm comfortable saying that technically, I'm in Alphitonia Place (not Wedgetail Circuit). BTW whilst there was no traditional 'pillar' in that Street view picture you linked to (as you're aware, reading your explanation), a traditional pillar was later deployed near the CMUX and ISAM (I'm guessing this was in preparation for the micronode again based on what you said). The Micronode is only a few metres from those small green power/transformer boxes (the pillar is closest to those green power boxes).

    As you work for NBNCo, you'll probably get a laugh out of this - when I was activated on NBN back in mid 2017, I was only syncing at 8mbps down. Some trouble shooting via the RSP, managed to get me up to 10-12mbps and they eventually logged a fault with NBNCo. NBNCo sent someone out (a Contractor?) who said he swapped me over to a different pair at the pillar which was in better condition (??) but then also bad-mouthed NBNCo and said there was a major fault at the main node (on Young Road) as he was only getting a result of something like 60mbps directly at the pillar (which I'd assume would be caused by the distance from the node and/or the condition of the copper, not a node fault). Getting a licenced cabler in yielded a decent boost to 36mbps (which was what I synced at for quite some time until sync rates started to fall to a constant ~30mbps) to disconnect two additional phone points. The house was built with CAT5E as my mate did the cabling (who was also a licenced cabler).

    I also notice that two houses (near where Oakey Flat Road connects to Young Road) on Wedgetail Circuit were unable to connect to the NBN until the micronode was deployed so there was some sort of critical issue going on. I found out by checking most of the Wedgetail Circuit houses on Future Broadband's SQ tool to see how my speed compared when I stumbled across it.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
  7. caspian

    caspian Member

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    yeah, no problems - street location was quite enough to go looking.

    normally they cut micronodes in using an underground joint but it looks like this wasn't an option in this case. at a guess because the cabling leaving the cabinet had a much larger pair count than the premises targeted for the micronode.

    yeah, the sync at the pillar would be less than "normal" due to distance and coexistence settings - if the tech hadn't seen that scenario before it can confuse. I spent an hour and a half this morning teaching a group of survey people how not to be tricked by some similar conditions that were causing test results well outside what they expected.

    the houses near the Oakey Flat Road intersection are right at the end of the cable run, I'd say their lines were outside SQ minimum and were tagged as unserviceable pending the micronode. not unusual for that to occur, especially if the pillar is not relatively central to its coverage footprint.
     
    Last edited: Jun 5, 2020
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  8. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    Hopefully this is the right spot for this question...
    My mum has adsl and old foxtel. I want to upgrade both, eg get nbn installed and a new foxtel box. Does it make much difference which one I do first?

    (not looking for a foxtel debate, I know it's crap but she's old, she knows how to use it and enjoys the shows she watches)
     
  9. caspian

    caspian Member

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    the simplest solution might be to select Foxtel for the NBN provider and let them coordinate it all.
     
  10. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    interesting, I didn't realise foxtel offered internet. Prices are similar but the current ISP have said they'll waive connection and modem fees, also mum will need to give up her email address....
     
  11. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    I'd imagine NBN internet first and then ancillary services such as Foxtel... keep in mind Foxtel are moving all customers to satellite, end 2023.



    JSmith
     
  12. TheWedgie

    TheWedgie Insert Custom Title Here

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    Is her current Foxtel via cable or satellite?

    My parents had Internode ADSL, and an IQ2 Foxtel via HFC.
    Called Foxtel, requested an upgrade to IQ4, which also meant migration to satellite - got that for free, too. Was prepared to cancel their Foxtel and sign up again a month later on one of the special deals, if they didn't come to the party.
    A few days later requested Internode to move to NBN via HFC. Techs came out within a day or two of each other.

    I don't think it would have made a difference in which order things happened, because of the Foxtel migration to satellite.

    The wall plate in the lounge used to have 2 cat5e and coax - the Foxtel guy used the coax as a draw wire and the NBN guy used one of the cat5's as his - both were pretty happy with that.
     
  13. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    current foxtel is cable so she'll need to upgrade to satellite. I might do nbn first because they offered to waive the connection and modem fee (thanks dropouts). Foxtel will probably need more negotiation and the treat of cancelling.


    Related question, when switching from adsl to FTTC, will there be more than a few hours of internet outage? or is just a case of disconnecting old, reconnecting new?
     
  14. TheWedgie

    TheWedgie Insert Custom Title Here

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    Perhaps, although they're haemorrhaging customers at the moment so if you go through to disconnections first they might be pretty accommodating.

    FTTC or HFC?

    Some RSP's won't disconnect the ADSL until you confirm the NBN is connected, so for HFC you can end up with both connections active (it's how Internode did it at my parents place).

    Not sure as I've not had any exposure to FTTC, but I suspect it would be similar to FTTN where your copper lead-in is reused so would only be down for the time it takes the tech to unjumper the copper mains and jumper you to the node/curb.
     
  15. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    FTTC... they had planned to put in FTTN but then they upgraded it, conveniently just after the election that made us a swing electorate
     
  16. stiben

    stiben Member

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    I assisted someone with a similar move late last year when they swapped ADSL to NBN and Foxtel were keen as mustard to change their TV service from cable to satellite at no cost. Was installed in under a week and they got the latest iQ box too.
     
  17. MELso76

    MELso76 Member

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    FTTC is as simple as plugging in the NCD (generally). If it's been wired up correctly and no further work is required (check that you're SC33 here), a relay automatically cuts the ADSL off.

    However, if you're changing provider, you'll need to ring the old one to cancel your ADSL service.
     
  18. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    SC32
    Serviceable by FTTC, cut-in required (NCD required)
    that makes it a bit more work right?
     
  19. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    A one day tech appointment, probably. not that big a deal
     
  20. AngelMoo

    AngelMoo Member

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    thanks everyone! just need to get off my butt and make some phone calls now
     

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