"The Red Hill Guide" Computer History website - interesting nostalgia

Discussion in 'Retro & Arcade' started by the3coopers, Mar 28, 2013.

  1. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    I stumbled on this site this evening while googling for "Quantum Bigfoot". It look bland but there's lots of content hidden in there

    Hard Drives: http://redhill.net.au/d/i.php

    CPU section: http://redhill.net.au/iu.html

    Motherboards: http://redhill.net.au/ib.html

    To naviagate, you can use the menu jumps at the bottom of the page, and the arrows at top left.

    There's pages that create index too - you need to dig around to find the good stuff

    Enjoy :)
     
  2. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    Just as well there's the long weekend coming up. I spent a few days reading every article on there a while back. There's some fascinating stuff, especially since (coming from someone who was running a shop) there's good information on reliability and stability of the hardware.
     
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    the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    Yep, it's awesome... I just read the last page of the CPU section, and remembered I still have my Athlon 2500+ XP Barton.

    I loved that AMD chip, it was a total beast back in the day - it overclocked like a demon, but after testing it I ended up running it at stock speeds for the rest of it's life because i didn't need any more than that!
     
  4. Flamin Joe

    Flamin Joe Member

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    Wow the memories. I was just reading about the Slot A AMD's, they were one of the last AMD CPU's I had before I switched to Intel and never looked back. I had an Athlon 500 which I brought from the US along with an ASUS K7M Motherboard which had the rock solid AMD 750 chipset. That was awesome PC and I wish I still had the board and CPU.

    I cracked that CPU open like many did at the time but unfortunately mine only had a 550 core. :( I cranked it up to relatively easy 600 overclock with one of those Orb Coolers, damn it looked good.

    The last AMD CPU I had was an Athlon 2500+ as well.

    Awesome site. :thumbup:
     
  5. Kafoopsy

    Kafoopsy Member

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    I have spent many hours reading through that site. It is excellent as it is opinions on hardware from the people that actually used and sold it.

    Something I found interesting was the praise he gave to Cyrix processors. I always heard that they were never much good, but according to Redhill, they were simply the best value processors around and very good performers too. That particular store sold a lot of them, but in my experience, they were never very common.

    I wish he had time to continue to add to the guide.
     
  6. DonutKing

    DonutKing Member

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    They were noticably faster than similarly clocked Intel chips in general usage. however, their FPU performance was lacking and a little game that came out at the time called Quake was very FPU intensive, and as more and more 3d games came out (all heavy on the FPU) the Cyrix chips tended to get a poor reputation from people that wanted to play the latest 3d games and were disappointed to find their Cyrix system struggled with it, yet their mate with a Pentium could play it no problems.
    They also used the 'PR rating' to rate their processors as the equivalent Pentium - eg a 6x86 PR200 actually ran at 150MHz or thereabouts. On the desktop this comparison was probably accurate but in 3d gaming, even a Pentium half the speed could thrash it.

    I remember this well as I had a 6x86MX PR166 many years ago and it was fine for multiplayer games of Warcraft 2, C&C or Doom but absolutely abysmal for Quake in comparison to a Pentium.

    The Red Hill Guys said on their site that they aren't gamers so for their purposes the Cyrix chips were excellent.

    Another note is that the Cyrix 5x86 is the most advanced processor you can get for a 486 motherboard. It includes a lot of design enhancements that were present in the Pentium class CPU's but no other 486 class CPU's.
    There are also a few experimental features that are disabled by default.
    Further reading: http://vogons.zetafleet.com/viewtopic.php?t=30607
     
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    the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    Same concept was stolen by AMD. They probably thought they were being clever, but many consumers just felt ripped off and deceived when they discovered how much they'd been "under-clocked".

    I remember clearly that there were many choices to make when I was ready to upgrade my 486SX25. I'd already dropped a DX2 in it, and the choice was to sell and change to Pentium or grab a "586"

    In the end I grabbed a Gigabyte board and a P133, mainly because I could then use more modern RAM.... and inadvertantly purchased the very first multiplier-locked Intel CPU :upset: :thumbdn:
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2013
  8. DIRT

    DIRT Member

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    The guy who wrote that built my first computer way back in 97 or so, he also helped me learn how to work on the damn things because I kept screwing it up and he'd walk me through how to get it working again, great guy definitely went above and beyond for a total noob.

    Haven't been in in a long time, last I checked he'd dropped his store hours to a couple days a week due to not needing to work any more than that.
     
  9. LinX

    LinX Member

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    This brings back memories. Especially some bad ones . Rdram anyone?
    Some good memories though like my p90, my k62 400, first duron 800 I got to run at 1066mhz. Those where the days.
     
  10. dustar

    dustar Member

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    I upgraded my 486DX2 - 66Mhz to a Cyrix 6x86 P150+ in 1997 or so. That PC is still connected; I still use it to play old games from the mid '90s.
    In those days, the setup utility of many games checked your hardware and I was every time disappointed when a game considered my PC as "only" a Pentium 120. :)
     
  11. crazyhatman

    crazyhatman Member

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    I had read through this site a few years back and loved every bit of it. I was only thinking about it the other day, when I found my old 486 and Pentium systems in the shed, and then it appears on the OCAU news page. Talk about good timing. :)

    I love this site not just for the history, but as others have said, the rich experiences documented about compatibility and availability. I remember especially in the late nineties, it wasn't just what you wanted and could afford, but what was in stock at the time, or how long you could hold out for something.

    :thumbup:
     
  12. adz

    adz Member

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    I love my little P4 1.6 423 Willamette/RDRAM combo box, runs really well IMO...
     
  13. bobbth

    bobbth Member

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    Modern

    :wired:
     
  14. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    You can't really expect them to go back and continually updated each page as it becomes outdated. When it was written (and most likely for quite a few years afterwards) that would have been perfectly reasonable.
     
  15. partybear

    partybear Member

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    I bought my first 3dcard from that shop, a voodoo2. That guy was one of the only computer shops that didn't bullshit you and try to sell you 100's of dollars of stuff you didn't need. I don't remember his name but I think he was gay.
     

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