The watercooling guide for starters

Discussion in 'Extreme and Water Cooling' started by spikes, Aug 1, 2007.

  1. spikes

    spikes Member

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    Since there are so many people asking what I should buy and blah blah blah... I thought'd be nice to make this thread to help you puzzled people out there

    Part 1 - Aussie Based Watercooling stores

    Shops that sell quality and decent gear
    Chilled PC - Wide range of products
    Cool-Z - Recently started, stocks alot of quality Swiftech stuff
    GAM Mods - Sells the famous Thermochill radiators, decent watercooling range and alot of modding gear
    PC Case Gear - Very good reputation, sells everything from modding supplies to hardware and cooling
    Radiical - Again, very good reputation, sells quality cooling hardware
    PC Maniacs Excellent customer service! Dealt with them personally many times
    The Kool Room


    I also highly recommend Petra's Tech Shop, based in San Jose, California, USA for small orders or for those who don't mind paying dearer postage costs.

    Performance PCs is also a good store, located in Palm Bay, Florida USA. They have a very very wide range from modding gear to watercooling products, now only if Performance PCs opened up a franchise locally :rolleyes:

    And also nearly forgot to mention EK, they sell very quality stuff, based in Solevania, Flabbergast sells EK locally :D

    From a past order from Petra's, postage costs were:
    $15AUD for - 2x 4 oz. bottles of pentison G11
    - D-Tek waterblock mounting screws
    - 2x rubber grommets for fixing sharp edges for tubing to pass through

    Part 2 - Hardware choice

    YOU MUST NEVER EVER MIX COPPER AND ALUMINUM TOGETHER IN ONE LOOP
    , galvanic corrosion will eat the crap out of your blocks/radiator and produce clogs.
    Brass, nickel and copper are fine to be together


    Kits I recommend

    Budget:

    Mid Range:
    Swiftech H20-220 Apex Ultra

    Ultimate:

    GAM Mods kits, bundled with the well known Thermochill radiators.

    Great kits, basically the best parts you could choose put together in a kit.

    If you're after a watercooling kit where you aren't restricted by money, I recommend PA120.3 Extreme Performance kit



    For the first time watercooler, I recommend buying the Flabbergast High End Bundle. Its expensive for first time but worth it, great performance and will last you at least a year depending on your upgrade cycles

    I do not recommend the Swiftech H2O-120 Compact, as performance is just slightly better than the top end air coolers. Doesn't justify spending an extra $100 for 1* or 2* in temp difference




    Current best performing blocks on the market are

    CPU
    Swiftech Apogee GT - best bang for buck
    Swiftech Apogee GTX - Great performer, but the D-Tek Fuzion has taken the "King of the Hill" place when coupled with the nozzles
    D-Tek Fuzion (first gen and V2) - Great performer, known as the flow king as its one of the least restrictive blocks, pair this with the nozzle suitable for the job and its the best CPU WB you can get.
    EK Supreme - Just recently released but reviews have shown that its a great performing block, beats the stock fuzion but more restrictive than any CPU blocks listed here

    GPU
    Swiftech MCW60 - best bang for buck, performance is similar to the DD Maze 4
    Danger Den Maze 4 - Excellent GPU block with very low restriction, performance is similar to the MCW60
    Danger Den Maze 5 - Once again an excellent GPU block, revised version of the DD Maze 4, better performing
    Swiftech Stealth Revision 2 - Best performing full cover G80 block (the top is made of zinc plated aluminum, the chances of galvanic corrosion aren't entirely big but its best not to have any trace of aluminum in your loop)
    EK Full Cover blocks lineup - Roughly same performance as the MCW60, very sexy and elegant design
    D-Tek FuZion GFX - Great performer, but fairly restrictive, strong pump recommended. The newer revisons of the D-Tek Unisinks are great too, good contact and cooling.

    Chipset/MOSFET
    Swiftech MCW30 - can be mouted on almost everything, its internal base is flat, doesn't have any pins or channels so performance ain't as good as most of the others.
    EK Northbridge/Southbridge blocks - various versions for different chipset with good performance
    Danger Den chipset/Maze4 - haven't heard much and haven't had any experience about them but I believe they deserve a place on this list.
    Danger Den MPC Chipset blocks - I haven't had any experience with them but they do look like the have some serious butt kicking.
    EK MOSFET Blocks - Stylish and Elegant, these are one of the most popular MOSFET blocks on the market, they come in different flavours to suite the motherboard it was designed for.

    Pumps
    Laing D5/Swiftech MCP655 - reliable and powerful
    Laing DDC3.1 and 3.2 - The issue of reliability is still a mystery but the chances of failing are dramatically higher when paired with a aftermarket top.
    I haven't heard of any Laing DDC3.1 and 3.2 deaths. I recommend the pump if you have a small loop and using 3/8" tubing. Refer to section 1.1 for more info
    Ehiem 1250/1050 - haven't heard about them much but I do know that they are powerful and dead silent, although they need airflow over them to stop them from overheating.
    Iwaki RD-20/30 Best performance and most reliable pumps in the watercooling market, hard to source locally and can be found in US watercooling stores. Performance and reliablitiy of this pump comes a hefty price though

    Reservoirs Remember that the best position for a reservoir is before the inlet of a pump
    Swiftech MCRES Res Acrylic res - best bang for buck and perfect if you don't want to use a T-Line, easy filling and bleeding, compact
    EK Multioption reservoirs - very sexy elegant design, revised editions feature a stopper to stop air from being sucked back into the loop, whirlpools/vortex sometimes forms with a strong pump, available from Flabbergast, the only store that stocks EK in Australia :)
    Various acrylic bay reservoirs - decent reservoirs, heard that they can sometimes make you go to the toilet from the whoosing sounds if you have a strong pump and haven't got the reservoir filled up properly. There are also some designs that prevent this like the XSPC ones that have chambers and baffers to stop air from being sucked into the loop
    AlphaCool Coolcape reservoirs - decent things but haven't heard much about them and haven't used one myself either, A few xtremesystems members uses them
    T-Line Best option for those on a budget. You simply need a T-Line fitting



    Radiators
    Let me explain why there's two catergories, one is for the silent freak and the other is for the deaf fark aka low noise and high noise radiators

    Silent - optismised for low RPM, low CFM, low noise fans
    Thermochill PA120.x (PA120.1, PA120.2 and PA120.3) - best performing radiators but pricey because they're manufactured in the UK. Everything's alot dearer in the UK
    Thermochill PA160 Performs about the same as a dual 120mm fan radiator but with only with the use of one 120mm fan
    Swiftech MCR series (MCR120, MCR220 and MCR320) - best bang for buck radiators, excellent radiators, the MCR220's performance is in between the Black Ice Pro 2 and the Thermochill PA120.2. The MCR320 is currently the best bang for buck radiator, priced at $100 from Cool-Z
    HW Black Ice Pro (1, 2 and 3 radiators) - been around for a very long time and not bad radiators but Swiftech rads have beaten them by less flow and pressure drop


    Loud - optismised for high speed fans, high CFM, noisy fans

    HW Labs Black Ice Xtreme (1, 2 and 3) - Excellent radiators for high CFM fans (110cfm) and above

    The differences between low noise and high noise radiators is the fin density

    Low noise:
    [​IMG]

    High noise:
    [​IMG]

    Laing DDC tops

    Locally, us Australians can only buy the Alphacool or Radiical Laing DDC top from Radiical. Best out of the two is the Alphacool's top. Aftermarket tops have a larger inlet design increasing the pumps performance.



    Coolant Additives
    Pentison G11 Anti-freeze Aqua blueish in colour - available from Flabbergast - highly recommended
    Long Life Red Anti-freeze Red in colour, only available overseas and best from Petra's tech shop - highly recommended
    Swiftech Hyrdx Green in colour - available locally, very popular additive choice, inexpensive


    Hope you fellas have found this helpful ;)

    If anyone would like to see anything added to this guide, please let me know!


    Last updated 24th February 2008
     
    Last edited: Jun 29, 2010
  2. OP
    OP
    spikes

    spikes Member

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    Section 1.1

    Link: Laing DDC names and info



    DDC-2/ MCP 355 Failure Problems


    (or The Strange Case of the Stuttering Pump)
    Copied from this thread over at XS


    (Caveat: Sorry, the following is a little bit technical but may give you a good idea of what is happening with your Laing/Swiftech pump.)


    Okay, many of you experienced watercoolers that have been to the forums before or lurk here, know that the Laing/Swiftech MCP 655 pump has a good reputation for reliability and low failure rates. Same for the DDC-1 (also known as the MCP 350). The problem has been the more powerful DDC-2 (also known as the DDC+ or the MCP 355) which puts out 19.5 feet of head, and is no longer being made (the DDC 3.2 has replaced it). I purchased one of these DDC-2 pumps from Petra's Tech Shop (great place BTW !) with their top back in May to use for a series of Showdown articles that I have been releasing here at XS. Surprisingly the pump worked quite well for me for the first one month of testing, even though it was not in continuous daily use.
    After about five weeks, I decided that I would put this pump in one of the three computers in my little lab room and everything went fine for about four days until I noticed the E6700 CPU heating up to 83 deg C one morning. Doing a few checks revealed that the DDC-2 was now not running or not running correctly. Well, after looking over all the simple fixes like jimming the molex connectors and making sure the PSU rail was fine, I quickly drained the loop, removed the DDC-2 and replaced it with a MCP655, so that I could take the smaller pump out for inspection.
    Two weeks had passed before I had a chance to look at everything carefully and here is what I have now found:

    1 – If you take the regular top that comes with the DDC-2 (or Petra's top) and turn it over, you will see the large circular well which is about 8.02 mm deep. (this figure has been corrected from the original 7.75 mm so remember that when viewing Photo #2 below) (sorry, I do not have a micro-caliper at home) If you now look at the naked pump (with the top removed), you will see the impeller head sticks above its base by ~ 7.85 mm. (corrected from the earlier 7.60 mm estimate, so remember that when viewing photo #3 below) This leaves only ~ 0.10 to 0.15 mm difference between the top of the impeller head and the bottom of the screw-down top (or Petra's top, which has the same internal height). Normally, as the impeller spins this 0.15 mm will be filled with water (which at this location almost acts a lubricant). This stack height between the impeller and the 'roof' of the screw-down top is critically important; if it is too large, too much water will hold there, causing cavitation and lost head pressure/flow, if it is too tight the impeller risks bumping into the roof and stopping.

    2 – The 'motor' of this pump (and the DDC-1 and MCP 655) is an electromagnet which simply means that it is a looped coil of wire inside the housing that goes around the stator base. When current is applied, the impeller will follow the consequences of the famous 'right-handed rule' of electromagnetics and spin. If it is spinning correctly, the thermal heat generated from the impeller's ride on the ceramic bearing and the electromagnet will pass into the cool water flowing over the impeller. If the impeller is not spinning, the heat will be trapped in the pump and build up (quite quickly, I might add). How accurately, the wire is coiled in this electromagnet will determine if there are any 'gaps' in the electromagnetic field once current is applied whose importantance will be evident in a minute.

    3 – As the impeller starts to spin, once current is induced, it will pick up rotational acceleration and physically rise slightly (critically, this rise is determined by how strong the electromagnet in the base is and how much current is passing thru that electromagnet and is described in physics by an ancillary to the Maxwell equations (this takes the form of a triple integral that you would see in multivariable calculus). This rise for these small pumps (and the MCP 655) has as it's largest component, it's angular momentum, which takes place both in the XY planes and the Z axis (along the Z axis is how much the impeller wobbles as it spins around). (A tiny component of this rise is also determined by the water under pressure flooding the ceramic bearing as well) If this 'wobble' is too great, the impeller will careen into the screw-down top (just like a child's spinning top). (Thanks to C-Dale for taking a look at this and bringing everyone's attention to this aspect) Therefore, the distance between the top of the impeller and the bottom of the screw-down tops is critically important. Also, if there are gaps in the electromagnetic field generated by the stator, this 'wobble' will be magnified by some small factor. Again, if there are gaps in the electromagnetic field generated by the stator, and MORE amperage is sent thru the electromagnet especially during startup, then this will further increase the 'wobble' and make it even more likely that the impeller will careen in the bottom of the screw-down top. These effects are most critical during the initial start up phase of the impeller. After start up, angular momentum will be conserved (just as in a gyroscope for example) and the impeller's 'wobble' will be reduced.

    4 - The amount of amperage and its time delay onset are determined by the logic pattern laid down on the printed circuit board (PCB) that controls the electromagnet. If the amperage is allowed to start at some minimal value (enough to start the impeller in a multi-block waterloop for example) and then rises to its max, the impeller will start off smoothly without too much 'wobble'. If the amperage is raised too quickly or started at too high a level, then the impeller will wobble too much at the very start and careen into the bottom of the screw-down top.

    5 – When Liang put out the stronger version of the DDC-1, which was called the DDC-2 (with the orange impeller), they used a different electromagnet design (according to Petra) and raised the amperage from 0.75 to 1.5 amps. In this design, I believe they failed to take into account that this would now cause the impeller to rise even higher from the base and possibly touch the bottom of the supplied top or Petra's top.

    6 – Testing the PCB on the back of the pump with an oscilloscope reveals no problems. The PCB is not the culprit, in so far that there are actual current problems. The logic printed on the PCB is another matter, since I do not have access to Laing's engineering documents.

    7 – It takes very little friction (or downward pressue) to keep the impeller from spinning when it first starts up. (Roughly, I gauge this as about a dead weight of 250 grams (notice that grams is not a measurement unit for friction or pressure) – see the experiment in Photo #4 below where I have 170 gram pliers on the impeller to slow down its startup)

    8 – This is likely causing the impeller to wobble off and around the ceramic bearing and touch the bottom of the screw down top (which also means you now how a quandary, because if you screw down the top very tight, you lessen this ~0.15 mm headroom and if you leave it looser, you risk a leak). When the top of the impeller touches the bottom of the screw on top, there is now enough friction to prevent the impeller from picking up speed and spinning properly, or to spin more slowly (which is causing the 'sand' sound that many of you are hearing). Many of you will also be able to see this as 'stuttering' (which is the impeller trying to start up then hitting the ceiling, then bouncing back (Newton's third law), then repeating this process) if you look into the pump while you run it dry (just connect the pump to your PSU, but only for 1 ~ 2 seconds, any more and you risk damage to the ceramic bearing and PCB). This is also the reason why Gabe or Alex (Petra) are getting these pumps back and disassembling them only to find out that they work 'correctly' in ninety percent of the cases. This is a consequence of the impeller rising and being stopped before it starts its spin up, and with no top, there is nothing to slow it down. Or, Gabe or Alex then screw on the top again, only though, maybe just a little bit less tight than you had it on there in your home, and the pump seems fine when it starts it up dry. That is why this problem has been so hard to diagnose.

    9 – This stoppage of the impeller is mitigated a tiny bit by the orientation that you have the pump in.

    10 – Depending upon the viscosity of the coolant you are using, how tight you screwed on the top, what PCB logic design you have, and several other factors, these impeller stoppages could start as soon as you buy the pump or take place months later (or perhaps never occur). That is the ghost in the machine and the reason why it has been so difficult to pinpoint the troubles with this specific pump (the DDC-2). I also increased the viscosity of the water pouring thru the pump with cooking oil (along a known viscosity curve to mimic those using this pump with zerex, hydrix, etc) and found it to be very, very sensitive and unpredictable to viscosity differences.

    11 – I suspect, but am not sure (so please do not do this, until we hear back from someone in the know at Laing or Swiftech) that many of these problems would disappear if we were to grind off another 0.25 mm from the circular depression that is on the the bottom of the screw-on tops (or add a gasket to the top of the stator as Jedda suggested below). This would reduce head pressure and flow slightly but it would be an easy fix that those at home could do.

    12 – The reason why the failure rate for the DDC-1 pumps is so much smaller is that less amperage is being pumped thru the electromagnet (and a possibly better electromagnet design) (and therefore the spacing of the wires around the electromagnet is also less critical), which causes the impeller to wobble off its base less, (and is within the 0.15 mm safety range (the tops for the DDC-1, DDC-2 and DDC 3.2 are exactly the same). The DDC-1 impeller also spins slower and therefore, if it does occasionally touch the bottom of the screw on top, there is less friction, and less chance that the impeller will be stopped. Additionally, the PCB circuit design for the DDC-1 may allow for a slower ramp up of the amperage (to 0.75 amps) which would mean less wobble at start up before angular momentum is conserved.

    How sure do I feel that this is the correct answer to describe most of the problems that you are having or will be having; fairly sure. Although, I am an engineer in the real world, I have only spent about three hours on this problem (in addition to the time I spent setting up the viscosity curve). I do not work for Laing's QC unit and I do not have access to their engineering documents, but I feel the above statements are likely true, although I cannot be 100% sure. I would welcome feedback from any other engineers or technicians who have experience with this pump and can test my results more accurately. There have also been some cases where it looks to me like the heat buildup from the impeller being blocked has led the PCB to be damaged but this is a secondary effect. The critical question is: If the above is true, will the new DDC 3.2 pumps (which are the redesigned slightly less powerful version of the DDC-2) be affected? I cannot answer that, but alot will depend upon how the PCB has been redesigned for the DDC 3.2, how exactly the wire was looped for the DDC 3.2 electromagnet (allowing for no 'gaps'), how much clearance Liang left in the screw down tops (which appears to be the same ~ 8 mm !) and how much amperage they pass thru the electromagnets in those pumps (which I think is 1.5 amps). It is entirely possible that Liang, just looped a bit less wire in the electromagnet for the DDC 3.2 without realizing it may be a on/off friction issue with the impeller head caused by too much amperage or to quickly ramping up the amperage thru the PCB. I have notified Gabe and Petra of this, and I hope this helps out anyone who may own these pumps.

    Please keep reading to the Test Section:



    Testing Section


    Test 1 - Placing a dyed fatty acid on the top of the impeller, shows that the impeller is indeed making contact with the polyoxymethylene (Delrin, the material used in the top) on startup.

    Test 2 - The contact between the impeller and the stock top or Petra's top can be mitigated somewhat by how tightly the screws are tightened down. Tightening the screw down on Petra's top till they almost stopped, resulted in about a 90% chance that the impeller would fail at startup. Backing those same screws off by 3 full revolutions decreased this failure rate to about 45%.

    Test 3 - Some investigation with the oscilloscope reveals that the amperage is not being being ramped up correctly at impeller start up for the DDC-2 pumps. This is causing the impeller to wobble around more than it should at startup.

    Test 4 - Without taking apart the stator and voiding my warranty (which I need, so I can return this pump), I cannot comment on the wiring pattern for the electromagnet.

    Test 5 - Likewise, after careful inspection, I cannot comment on the manufacturing of the impeller itself. Many of the problems that we are seeing, would be greatly amplified if the moment of the impeller were off balance (this is most crucial at startup).

    Test 6 - The DDC 3.2 pump did exhibit some of these same problems although to a lesser degree (at least for the model I have). The failure rates with the top screwed on all the way are about 40%, and with the screws backed out, it drops to about 5 ~ 10%. After just speaking to Alex (Petra), he has told me that the DDC 3.2 is a complete redesign and that the amperage is raised in a very slow curve allowing for much smoother startup. Although, I have not had a chance yet to examine the PCB of the DDC 3.2, I will look at this in more detail this week.

    Therefore, taking all this info in (along with the keen eye of my lab buddy, an experienced electrical engineer and two technicians from our department's machine shop), I would say the most likely culprits behind these strange failures are:

    1 - Laing designed the circuit layout incorrectly on the DDC-2 PCB with its more powerful electromagnet, when they made the switch from the DDC-1. They increased the amperage from 0.75 amps to 1.5 amps but did not change the onset time delay in the PCB. Therefore, the impeller starts up too quickly, with too much wobble and careens into the bottom of the screw-down tops. (this is the answer that I personally feel is most likely)

    2 - Laing has made a small manufacturing error in how the wire for the electromagnet was looped in the DDC-2 models, causing 'gaps' in the electromagnetic field which induces greater wobble of the impeller at start up.

    3 - Laing has made a small manufacturing error in how the impeller itself is weighted (the 'moment' of the impeller is off), which greatly exaggarates any wobble. (some users have said they felt their impeller was defective in some small manner)

    Further, the ripple (often called noise) on standard 12 volt direct current PSU rails is not enough to account for the DDC-2's problems. And although, the stack height between the top of the impeller and the bottom of the screw-down tops is critically important, it is not the main culprit. Raising this height, or sanding off material from the bottom of the screw-down tops will simply allow minute cavitation and result in lost head pressure and/or flow. These three problems described above are unfortunately only problems that Laing can correct and not you (at least not easily). Surely, this article will reach Laing at some point and they can then critically review this.

    Until that time comes though, here are the home remedies which may help you:

    1 - If you have impeller stoppage or hear a 'sand' like grinding sound, back off the bolts of the screw-down top by one to two revolutions. (yes, your head pressure and flow may drop by a very small amount, but this is better than redoing the entire loop and sending the pump back to Laing)
    2 - Mount the pump horizontally.
    3 - Do not use viscous fluids with the DDC-2. 100% distilled water and biocide will be one of your best bets here.
    4 - Although not critical to the failure rate, raising the pump and cooling it with a fan, can only help



    After having just spoken to Alex, I will spend some time testing the DDC 3.2 and we will see how she holds up. So, probably some more updates later this week.


    I hope this helps out for now and I will notify Laing about this,
    Jay



    Photo #1 – Taking a look at the DDC-2 to troubleshoot
    Photo #2 – The 7.75 depth of the circular depression at the bottom of Petra's screw on top (actually this distance is ~ 8.02 mm, as corrected by Petra)
    Photo #3 – The ~ 7.60 mm that the impeller head rises above the base. (actually this figure is about 7.75 ~ 7.78 mm)
    Photo #4 – The downward weight (and by calculation, the resultant pressure or friction) needed to stop the impeller is being examined.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2007
  3. OP
    OP
    spikes

    spikes Member

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    Section 1.2

    Reserved for part 1.2
     
    Last edited: Nov 17, 2007
  4. ojk007

    ojk007 Member

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    this is a good idea, we havent really got one of these.

    What would be good is a step by step guide installing a system.

    edit: this would be perfect for the wiki
     
    Last edited: Aug 1, 2007
  5. OP
    OP
    spikes

    spikes Member

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    its going to be a step by step pictorial guide
     
  6. CordlezToaster

    CordlezToaster Member

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    good job spikes! also i would love a good efective method or a great way to bleed the air out of ya setup...


    just a thought
     
  7. faceboy88

    faceboy88 Member

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    Great idea! Might help to convert some of us less knowledgeable to the dark side :)
     
  8. samwise123

    samwise123 Member

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    nice work mate.. and just so you know th ek link dosnt work you got .au on the end :D
     
  9. Frag_Lord

    Frag_Lord Member

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    Nice guide Spikes :p

    Also loving the image linkage from XS :p
     
  10. OP
    OP
    spikes

    spikes Member

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    damm me :lol:

    wondering if this would be good as a sticky? so when people first come into this section and want to watercool, they at least gain some knowledge
     
  11. Flabbergast

    Flabbergast (Banned or Deleted)

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    Hey spikes,

    with the GPU blocks... I think the Fuzion GFX should at least get a mention - I know it has fallen from grace due to its relatively large hit on flow - but does also offer some of the best temps of any of the blocks... check out here for some compartive testing and also some thoughts from xs

    What do you think?
     
  12. The Wraith

    The Wraith Member

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    Why would this be made a sticky when there already is a sticky for this very purpose called the Extreme Cooling Forum Collective sticky.

    There are also a number of corrections needed.
    The Pumps section refers to the MCP350 and 355 pumps as though they were still available. They are discontinued and replaced by the Laing DDC 3.1 and 3.2. I am unsure how you can claim they have a lifespan of 1 in 3 for 2 months. I am sure Laing would have something to say about that.

    The Eheim pumps information is also wrong. The two Eheim pumps most commonly used in water cooling have been the Eheim 1250 and the Eheim 1048 not the 1050 as you state.The 1250 is not dead silent and produces a low hum which some people find annoying. The 1048 is probably the quietest pump around. Neither of these pumps require additional cooling and they will not overheat.

    I also cannot see the need for a bold red pronouncement that you should not mix dissimilar metals when in the best performing CPU block category entry you advocate using a Swiftech Apogee GTX which has a copper base and an anodized aluminum top. I am sure you being a regular visitor to XS would be aware of the controversy over this.

    I will leave others to discuss with you the radiator entry.
     
  13. Suki

    Suki Member

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    Yeah, there's some bowed Fuzion owners who'd disagree with bowed GTX holding the crown, too.
    Lets upgrade existing stickies if they're falling out of date.
     
  14. CordlezToaster

    CordlezToaster Member

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    why not reinvent the wheel? you might get better mileage out of it.
     
  15. Gaidin

    Gaidin Member

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    Yeah, just going through it shows how out of date its got - retailers that arent even in business anymore :o
     
  16. dirtyd

    dirtyd Member

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    Good stuff, but I agree it should just be edited into the existing sticky. PM or email an admin?
     
  17. Mr.Sinister

    Mr.Sinister Member

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    This is EXACTLY what the Dr ordered Spikes! I've been trying to educate myself madly over the last couple of weeks but this has really helped.
     
  18. Jarwedy

    Jarwedy Member

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    Location:
    Rockhampton, QLD
    Quite interesting!. Actually this gives me more than 2 places to get WC parts from. I had PCCG and Radical. I was thinking off grabbing a Astek kit with the CPU/GPU/RAD/Pump/Tubing all ready to go. But then again, thinking ahead to future proof myself, I'd have to swap the Apogee block for a Dtek, and maybe dump the GPU block for one that will cater for a G80. :) It would actually be quite costly to do this than custom build one that may cost a tad more than a RTG (ready to go) kit.

    Spikes - When you get around to it (you probably already thought of this already), Say why it is or isn't good to have A high end GPU(G80) in the same loop as a High end or Overclocked CPU(Q6600++) or the best way to do both in the same loop if you actually can (2 pumps 2 240 rads, maybe not lol). Or it could be in the FAQ or such.

    Look forward to seeing it finished.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2007
  19. Simwah

    Simwah Member

    Joined:
    Aug 6, 2005
    Messages:
    1,998
    Location:
    Bardon, Brisbane
    I don't even have watercooling (yet) but you could go.

    rad(a) -> t-line(fillport) - > pump(a) -> cpu -> rad(b) -> pump(b) -> gpu -> rad(a)

    You could probably even do away with pump(b).

    If i'm wrong, tell me oh watercooling gods.
     
    Last edited: Aug 6, 2007
  20. The Wraith

    The Wraith Member

    Joined:
    Feb 7, 2007
    Messages:
    419
    Your wrong T line on inlet side of pump.
     

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