to island stove top, or not to island stove top.

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by NSanity, Jan 22, 2011.

  1. The King

    The King Member

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    Asian cooking, especially Indian and Malaysian style, is lot different to 'Australian' cooking.
     
  2. connico

    connico Member

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    Yeah but we still use the good old BBQ :p
     
  3. FromPaul

    FromPaul Member

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    parents just went through this in the new house, ended up moving the sink and dishwasher to the island and the cooktop to the wall side.

    The cooktop had to go the wall owing to how the ceiling of the second floor connected above the kitchen, you couldn't move the rangehood off the wall without getting some big costs to reinforce the roof.

    Mum chose instead to spend big on the tap and sink combo to make that standout on the bench.
     
  4. scon

    scon Member

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    We lived in the US for a little while when I was growing up and had one of those 'downdraft extractors' and they were excellent. Best extractor I've used - if I had a kitchen island I'd be using one for sure.
     
  5. GRaNTiSB

    GRaNTiSB Member

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    Better alternatie to ILVE would be the locally made Highland for the hotplate.

    If you're worried about the extraction strength- i would suggest having a look at QASAIR. They're bloody powerful, yet quiet.
     
  6. sanjay

    sanjay Member

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    the answer to this question is obvious, no? the weather in malaysia is shit all year around - muggy as hell and hot. having an outside kitchen - fine, as you always know the weather will be conducive to cooking outside (if youre into the shit weather of that region).

    in australia - you cant have an outdoor kitchen, because while it would be awesome in summer - it would suck in winter. :)
     
  7. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    You serious? That's going to depend a whole shitload on what part of australia you live in...

    In brisbane it's pleasant outside all year rain aside, with possibly the exception of one week in the depths of winter

    I grew up in a house who's only dining room was the deck for example, and it was extremely pleasant all year round. I'm with amfibius on kitchen design in brisbane or any further north. In fact I know a family who built a very high end kitchen in the sunshine coast that's kind of a western adaptation of what he describes. The kitchen's open to the outside area, and a significant portion of the outside area's built around a large prep bench, inbuilt bbq, wok burner, outdoor wash sink etc
     
    Last edited: Apr 16, 2012
  8. caspian

    caspian Member

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    kitchen porn, dude. seriously. respect.
     
  9. The King

    The King Member

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    Tis a beauty, but we've done better ;)

    Might post some more up tomorrow.
     
  10. stevenx

    stevenx Member

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    Please do. My old man is in the market for a new kitchen and fell in love with some kitchen shop he found in Tokyo a year or two ago. He's convinced that the only way to go is to buy EVERYTHING from there and have it sent over. He's an idiot.
     
  11. Furious

    Furious Member

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  12. renagade

    renagade Member

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  13. The King

    The King Member

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    What kind/style/type of kitchen was it?
     
  14. Furious

    Furious Member

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    From an entertaining point of view, you could still see and talk over somthing like this, plus it would provide a splashback of sorts and you wouldn't need an everhead rangehood which you keep banging your head on.
     
  15. j3ll0

    j3ll0 Member

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    The best idea for island benches I've seen recently was induction cooktop. No knobs or raised bits to clutter up the space when you're not actually cooking on it. Worked beautifully.

    Did a class here



    : this is the kitchen I'm talking about.

    .
     
    Last edited: Apr 17, 2012
  16. stevenx

    stevenx Member

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    Small and space conscious. Which doesn't make sense because my parents house is enormous - 120 squares.
     
  17. The King

    The King Member

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    If he's keen to do something, PM me, I'll make sure we look after him.
     
  18. clockwork

    clockwork Member

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    I see a couple of people have commented on Caesarstone and being stained by red wine. Doesn't happen. We have Caesarstone in our kitchen, (40mm thick, one piece weighed 280kg and took three guys to bring it in and position on cupboard carcass) and before I went with it I asked for a sample and put a cut lemon, red wine, curry paste, hot chilli sauce, vinegar (black and white), Angostura Bitters and other stuff I can't remember on the sample and left it for a day. Only one that didn't come off straight away was the Bitters which required a quick buff with the cleaner Caesarstone supply.

    Four years on and there is not a mark on the surface and we entertain A LOT. Lots of red wine has been spilled and there is a coffee machine and grinder in one corner that gets moved once every few months. The coffee grounds and water sit under the machine and do not make any marks on the Caesarstone.

    On the stove top, we went with a 90cm 6 burner Ariston with the optional cast iron trivets. Again looks like new, yet is used every day including cooking Italian sauces and the like which simmer for up to four hours. The secret is to make sure it is kept clean so food doesn't burn and carbonise on the stainless steel. We throw the trivets into the dishwasher about once a week.

    Good luck with the kitchen, we love the way ours is part of the entertainment area.
     
  19. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I have 40mm dark caesarstone with a quartz fleck and it's bloody tough - I agree that stains are not a factor. we obviously are careful not to scratch it and I won't put hot pans on it so not to damage the resin, although I have seen video of people doing it. :sick:

    clockwork, how do you get on with your trivets - no rust issues? I bung my extractor hood filters through the dishwasher, hadn't thought to try the trivets.
     
  20. clockwork

    clockwork Member

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    Hi Caspian,

    No rust issues on the trivets. They seem to have some sort of coating on them, could be vitreous.
     

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