Use 60GB SDD as smart response cache SSD?

Discussion in 'Newbie Lounge' started by draistlin, Aug 3, 2011.

  1. draistlin

    draistlin New Member

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    So i've just built my computer and because i had some issues with the installation of windows 7 i took it in to centrecom for them to troubleshoot. The problem i have now is that i'll be getting hold of a kingston 64GB SSD tomorrow, so is it worth it to reformat everything and install the windows onto the SDD, or should i just use Intel Smart Response and add the SSD as a separate drive?
     
  2. Linkin

    Linkin Member

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    Use the SSD like you would a HDD. I do have some advice:

    1) Disable unnecessary startup options (they seem to grow as you install various programs that are "helpful" in loading their own services and tray icons. Huge waste of resources)
    2) open a command prompt and type "powercfg h off" - this disables hibernation and deletes the hiberfile.
    3) Disable search indexing, superfetch and volume shadow copy, and disk defragmanting services
    4) Make sure to load the latest firmware onto the drive before you install, else when you update it it will wipe the drive
    5) Have BIOS/UEFI settings correct, this means setting the sata controller to AHCI and disabling SATA/IDE combined mode
    6) In windows, disable all pagefiles and set a static 512mb-1gb pagefile onto your SSD drive. Using a HDD for pagefile is slow and negates benefits of the SSD and disabling it entirely causes some programs to not function and you won't get any BSOD dump files.

    I think that's all the major ones done.
     
  3. miicah

    miicah Member

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    Get vLite and make a slim install of Windows 7, should save you up to 5gb depending on what your remove.
     
  4. LostBenji

    LostBenji Member

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    This last bit is debateable. Dump files are a waste to most and still won't help for whats in the RAM at time of shitting ones pants.
    The other issue is why use a PF at all. There are few programs that are anal about it like photoshop but it sooon resolved when you tell it to butt-out.

    RAM is cheap, no excuse not to have enough to kill off the PF totally and save shortening the already limited life of SSDs.
     
    Last edited by a moderator: Aug 4, 2011
  5. TomDonnley

    TomDonnley Member

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    If you dont mind the issues of managing where you put your files and are comfortable rebuilding your OS if their is a problem use it as a HDD.

    If either of those is a problem use it as a SRT and you wont look back.
     
  6. Linkin

    Linkin Member

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    I've seen no evidence that SSD's have a shorter life than HDD's. They get slow if you fill them up, sure. A Secure Erase is your friend.

    Have you got a flash drive that you've had for many years and no longer reads or writes? No? Then you shouldn't have an SSD that does that either, especially seeing as they've been out for such a short time.

    For the time being at least, page file is necessary. Having a small, fast one on your SSD will improve performance compared to your HDD. Sure, having it disabled is faster than both, but for the time being, some programs won't work, you won't get dump files from a bsod (there are other reasons for bsod other than failed overclock and drivers you know).
     
  7. Reaper_1994

    Reaper_1994 Member

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    From what i saw i while back you could use the speed of an SSD put with a normal HDD and get a 70%ish increase in speed compared to just a HDD. It's still slightly slower then just installing windows on an SSD but it's genius. I think some of the RAID cards do that:confused: It's a bit like (or a lot like) the Seagate Momentus HDD that has the 4GB SSD built-in to speed up boot times and loading times of most used programs, just for desktops :D
     
  8. Sent2Strike

    Sent2Strike Member

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    Fresh install is mostly always the best way to go. If you already have windows 7 on another set of HDD you don't need to format them first, just go ahead and install it on the SSD and make the SSD the boot disc in bios.

    Make sure you have it in either ACHI or Raid mode on the Sata chipset controllers to enable trim support. VERY IMPORTANT!

    I assume with such a small SSD you are mainly using it as a boot drive anyway. So make sure that in windows you change the default save directories for your media files i.e. videos, music etc.
     
  9. Dr Evil

    Dr Evil Member

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    I have a momentus XT, owned it for a year or longer now. It's been into various machines as to me its best bit is to shave off a few seconds on boot from a normal HDD. Its nothing compared to an SSD. The drive now sits in a netbook.. the end
     
  10. woodys_world69

    woodys_world69 Member

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    I had a 60GB SSD and ran out of space.

    I would rule out installing Windows onto the SSD, and get a bigger capacity, unless u just do email and internet browsing on the Computer. Games, Office, Photoshop etc will eat up ur SSD space fast.
     
  11. g3monster

    g3monster Member

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    On a 60gb ssd games dont belong there.

    A 60gb ssd with an optimised install of windows 7 should have atleast 45gb remaining which is more than enough for office + photoshop etc.

    Games always go on a mechanical hdd unless you have a 120+gb SSD.

    My 60gb ssd was fine for a long time with windows 7 + Visual studio + office 2010 + Photoshop.

    The only time it ever ran out of space was because I left a massive amount of extracted sourcecode on it.
     
  12. LostBenji

    LostBenji Member

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    It's a known fact that SSDs have limited read/write, I don't need to argue or prove it.


    I have plenty, they read and write with errors or data corruption and fail if not already binned.


    Let the OP try for him/herself as it's just opinions floating here.
     
  13. miicah

    miicah Member

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  14. NNNG

    NNNG Member

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    The amount of read and write cycles required to kill a SSD are very high, and are not the limiting factor in SSD reliability. Just because they have limited read and write doesn't mean they have a shorter lifespan at all.
     
    Last edited: Aug 7, 2011

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