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Vibration of 3.5" HDDs loudest thing I can hear

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by drunkntigr, Sep 14, 2020.

  1. drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    I like silent PCs, short of going fanless.

    Been tinkering around with my latest build and have found:

    Loudest object is a Seagate 3TB drive that goes at 7200RPM - going to get rid of this as apparently this specific model had a 30% failure rate, coming up on 16000 hours. Combination of vibration noise and the whirl of the disks.

    Next loudest is a 4TB WD Red, fairly new about 3000 hours so not too keen on getting rid of this. Because it's an ITX build, limited space I can put HDDs, have this one placed on the bottom of the case with some felt pads. Even if I put it in the actual mount with the rubber gromets, can still hear the vibration resonate through the case and consequently noise generation via the whole case vibrating.

    I was looking at two solutions:

    Finding some ridiculous rubber pads that may or may not work.

    Replacing them with 2x2TB SSDs - at very great expense (I don't find the sense in spending more on 2 hard drives than the entire build).

    Is there anything else you can think of that I can do? (No NAS as NAS themselves are quite loud and expensive)

    I've already gone through and converted all the family videos down to H265 mp4 wiping off nearly a few hundred gb.
     
  2. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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  3. OP
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    drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    Sorbothane 6mm sheet vibration shock isolation pad

    Bought some of these last night. Hopefully 6mm is enough otherwise layer it. $30 for 10x10cm better be good.....

    This guy from another forum was taking it to the next level with the stethoscope

    "I've used a good deal of both Sorbothane and elastic similar to the "no-Vibes" method. Both work equally well. The physics are pretty straightforward: you need enough Sorbothane, with a low enough elastic coefficient (softness) to absorb the vibrational energy (turning it to internal heat) without passing it on to the frame it's mounted to. If it's too stiff, energy will simply be passed on to the metal frame. If it's too soft, if will be compressed, and become too stiff, with results same as above. The same problem arises if too little is used - it may be become too compressed, or it may simply not have the mass to absorb the vibrational energy and then pass it on to the metal frame. Experimentation is certainly needed, but it does work when used properly. Ralf's ideas and experience is very good; since I wanted great results with Sorbothane, I used 1"x4" strips on either side of the drives (using Seagate IV and Samsung Spinpoints) and 3/8" thick Sorbothane. No vibration was transferred as near as I could tell using a professional stethoscope. TiBors is on the right track when he references area, but it really is volume that counts, but area is also important to get the vibrational energy into the Sorbothane evenly. Hope this helps someone in their testing."
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
  4. power

    power Member

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    what chassis? decent ones will come with grommets.
     
  5. Hater

    Hater Member

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    SSD + cloud storage

    put videos you don't need all the time on one of your spinners but keep it spun down until you need to access the files

    Samsung 4TB 860's are $600 each. Doesn't seem all that over the top expensive. Not "cheap" but not $1000 like they used to be
     
    Last edited: Sep 14, 2020
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    drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    Yes I use HDD scan to manually close it when i was testing what the sound was, but when you go into explorer it automatically spins back up. heard on and off a big nono. or is spinning down vs a computer restart a different process for hdd?


    I like savvy upgrades, like ryzen was $300+$150 for case and $150 for mobo. Getting two of those would mean triple the upgrade price. It's more so a self motivational goal to achieve more with little.
     
  7. theSeekerr

    theSeekerr Member

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    The advantage of a NAS isn't that it's quiet (as you say, they generally aren't), it's that you can put it somewhere else where you don't have to hear it.
     
  8. Annihilator69

    Annihilator69 Member

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    I went with a SSD only PC and NAS in the garage.
    Pick up a second hand NAS and then you're also savvy?

    5400rpm drives are quieter obviously.
    Most manufactuers release noise levels these days on their datasheets, you can compare sounds.

    I find single platter HDD's to be the quietest, but they're also going to be around 1TB in size so not good for large disks.
     
  9. OP
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    drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    Yeah I have a 1TB WD red and it's got no vibration.

    I've just tried putting some sorbothane anti vibration foam and stuck some strips to the bottom of the 4tb WD sitting at the bottom of the case (see picture) and stuck to the bottom end of a 3tb seagate standing upright.

    I think the more exposure to surface area the sorbothane would work better, but it's hard as I ordered a 6mm thick piece and the top of the WD red at the bottom of the case nearly hits the video card.

    I tested the vibration of the hdd with the whole 10x10cm slab I ordered of the sorbothane and subjectively I feel it has probably reduced the vibrations by about 60-70%, but that was with plastic protective layer still on. The damn sorbothane is very sticky, not sure how to cleanly go about using sorbothane as I would imagine the more you use, the better the vibration absorbing effects will be.

    The material feels very dense, very heavy, feels more like a putty.

    I have a few strips crossing the underside of the HDD logic board so I hope it's not electrically conductive.

    Refer pictures

    Literally so little space for 3 full size 3.5' hdd's in this ITX case

    IMG_9741.JPG IMG_9742.JPG IMG_9740.JPG

    Despite the sorbothane though I can steel feel the whole case vibrate, but it has stopped the actual sound of the vibration. I'm assuming it's absorbed enough of the energy of the vibrations to reduce the amplitude of the vibrations - frequency would remain the same I would think as I don't think absorbing vibrations changes the frequency as that is dependent on the source? phy-sics
     
    Last edited: Sep 18, 2020
  10. JSmithDTV

    JSmithDTV Member

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    drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    Sound like what happens on rockets to frozen foods and ice, get liquified from vibrations (either due to frequency or intensity/amplitude).

    Read a few linking articles, I'm assuming it's from constant intense vibrations, either guy has his music really loud and fan was probably vibrating like no tomorrow generating enough heat to liquify it. Well worst thing is that the sorbothane will just leak through the mesh of the case onto my $19 ikea carpet.
     
  12. ozz

    ozz Member

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    its probably not the hdd thats doing the vibrating, something else in the computer may be making it vibrate, like a fan, or gpu if you have one , maybe you have onboard sound, cant see under the hdd , doubt the psu fan would be spinning all that hard that much either
     
    Last edited: Sep 19, 2020
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    drunkntigr

    drunkntigr Member

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    nah I've isolated it to be the HDDs, more so the vibration from the platters.

    More platters, more vibration.
    Higher platter speed, more vibration.

    The 3tb seagate at 7200rpm is the main culprit.

    The fan on the 212 cpu cooler is slow and doesn't vibrate, the noctua fans definitely don't. the be quiet psu fan doesn't vibrate - slight electronic buzzing noise but guess we can't really stop that.

    i measured the sound level and it's 34-38db right next to the sides of the case, and about 27-28 db where i sit about 0.6m away.

    considering each fan is rated at 15-19db and the hdd's themselves probably go 24-28db

    3 noctua fans 18db each
    cpu cooler fan 20db
    psu 20db
    3 hdds 25db each

    just at idle though

    I get about 31db cumulative
     
  14. ozz

    ozz Member

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    you thought about changing the drive itself tho, pita i know with all the stuff needing to be transfered and if the OS is on it even a worse pita
     
  15. swong

    swong Member

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    These days, with efficient fanless components and excellent silent fan options, HDD vibration and electric whine noises are probably the biggest sources of noise in desktop PCs, especially at idle (which is when you generally care about noise)

    In old build which had 4x fast spinning HDDs, I used this method to minimise vibration noise:
    https://silentpcreview.com/hard-drive-silencing-sandwiches-suspensions/
     

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