Want to access/backup filesystem on Medion NAS

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by azndude, Jul 20, 2012.

  1. azndude

    azndude Member

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    Bankstown Sydney NSW
    Wanted to know if anyone knows how I can recover my files thats on my NAS server.Medion Nas ?
    What Apps can i use ?
    I had to RMA my unit but before i go do that I want to recover my data.
    I took it apart and plugged the included Seagate 1.5 TB hdd into my PC
    It detects fine but I cant read the file system in Explorer W7
    Disc Management shows up as 2 partitions a 502MB and a 1396 partition
    It also asks me to convert it to a dynamic disc should I do that ?
    Is there any software to read the files on the hdd ?
    what OS would a NAS use ? Linux ? Im not familiar with using the Linux interface only tried GUI like Ubuntu keen for learning exp
    There arent much specs on this NAS but im up for trial and error and assumptions.
    if the NAS was using Linux How can I view Files from a Linux filesystem in windows ? I tried dl ext2explore-2.2.71 but I couldnt open anything
    So if anyone can point me in the right direction on how to view my files be much appreciated
    Thanks In advance
    :thumbup:
     
  2. mike-s

    mike-s Member

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    I had a Lacie that had a similar setup, it had a partition spanned across two 500gb drives as well as 4-5 OS volumes on one of the drives. It took me a little while to work it out, but I eventually recovered the data. As yours only has a single drive it may well be that it "only" uses ext3 or xfs which will make data recovery a tiny bit easier.

    The targets for doing all of this are:
    1) Tell us the *EXACT* model number of your drive, it may be an advanced format drive that uses 4k sectors rather than the "standard"/"old" 512byte sectors, this may screw with doing data recovery, or it may not, depending on the drives behaviour.
    2) identify the partition layout, and it's file system type
    3) attempt to mount the partition holding all your data
    4) Mount a drive to copy your data across to
    5) copy all your data across to the new drive
    6) remove all the data on the "old" drive unless you are ok with it remaining there
    7) unmounting the drive
    8) testing that the data is readable from within windows.

    It may seem a bit long winded, but linux is very very very powerful and entering the wrong command without knowing the syntax has the potential to completely nuke all your data. Hell I've done it myself, that wasn't fun.

    Try using a boot cd/usb key from www.sysresccd.org/ and have a bit of a poke around in there. I would recommend for this exercise that aside from the cd/dvd drive and the hard drive in question, you don't have any other drives connected "in case" while you first start poking around. Read through the links I put at the bottom of my post to help give you a *ROUGH* idea what you are doing and why and only then try booting from the linux boot disk and have a go at doing this.

    The first thing you need to do once you've booted with just the cd & problem drive connected is identify the file system type and determine if it is one you can access

    Looking at what file system is in use:
    With only the cd drive/usb key connected as well as the problematic drive, the first command to run is "fdisk -l", this will identify the partition tables of EVERY drive connected to the pc, the far right column on each drives layout will tell you the file system type. In the below example there is a LVM partition with type 8e which can be accessed from the raid command mdadm (but lets deal with that later) and there is a plain linux volume with type 83, which is pretty straight forward to access.

    Code:
    # fdisk -l
    
    Disk /dev/sda: 8589 MB, 8589934592 bytes
    255 heads, 63 sectors/track, 1044 cylinders
    Units = cylinders of 16065 * 512 = 8225280 bytes
    Disk identifier: 0x00008ec7
    
       Device Boot      Start         End      Blocks   Id  System
    /dev/sda1   *           1        1013     8136891   8e  Linux LVM
    /dev/sda2            1014        1044      249007+   5  Extended
    /dev/sda5            1014        1044      248976   83  Linux
    At this point you should Identify the file system types within the "System" column and take appropriate action based on the output. I'll give you a quick rundown of what to do if it's type 83, but if it's anything else, let us know and I/someone else will walk you through what you need to do next.

    mkdir /mnt/medion (making a mountpoint for the volume)
    mount /dev/sda5 /mnt/medion (Mounting the linux/type 83 volume onto mountpoint /mnt/medion)
    cd /mnt/medion (changing current directory to the mountpoint)
    ls -l (Looking at what is actually there, from experience I would believe that there would likely be user volumes as the directories and the data bundled somewhere below those)
    cd / (changing directory back to / so the volume can be unmounted)
    unmount /mnt/medion
    Report back with what your results are

    Some links that you should read that gives a smattering of concepts to look at to help you figure out what is there:
    http://www-uxsup.csx.cam.ac.uk/pub/doc/redhat/redhat8/rhl-sap-en-8.0/s1-storage-basics.html
    http://freeos.com/articles/3102/
    http://www.ibm.com/developerworks/linux/library/l-linux-filesystem/
    http://www.dummies.com/how-to/content/linux-file-system-basics.html
     
    Last edited: Jul 20, 2012
  3. OP
    OP
    azndude

    azndude Member

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    thx for the help and the very informative article ! :cool:
    I found out my Medion NAS uses XFS.I was able to view the files using UFS explorer.Couldnt save my files though itll cost me $50 for full ver to do so.
    Universal-USB-Installer from sysresccd makes installing OS via usb so easier compared to winpe. Thanks for the links
    im gonna try dl Ubuntu and try mounting the disc
    Ill post an update in a few days
    Cheers
     
  4. mike-s

    mike-s Member

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    Awesome,last me/us (if anyone else offers a hand ) know how you go.
     
  5. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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    For EXT2 and EXT3 filesystems (most NAS), get a copy of EXT2FS http://www.ext2fsd.com/

    Install it on the PC - Plug in the NAS drive to a USB - Open EXT2FS - r-click on the drive and choose "Drive Letter".

    For XFS, this looks like it might do the same kind of thing. I have not tested it http://www.crossmeta.org/crossmeta.html

    Another way - get a copy of Parted Magic or Partition Magic ISO and burn it to a boot CD. These boot to Linux but with a Graphical interface. Inside the menus of these kinds of programs is usually hidden a file manager of some form, and using that you can copy the data off onto a NTFS drive.
     
    Last edited: Jul 21, 2012
  6. the3coopers

    the3coopers Member

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