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Welders for noobs

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by Archades, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    I bought a $100 welding machine from Bunnings. It ain't the best, but neither am I. It does what I need it to do.

    Practising:
    [​IMG]


    Work in progress:
    [​IMG]

    Job done:
    [​IMG]
     
  2. TERRA Operative

    TERRA Operative Member

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    You going to finish off the tack welds and continue the weld all around?
     
  3. scorpydude

    scorpydude Member

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    It looks like a birdbath stand... why would he bother? those welds are plenty to hold a 10kg peice of stone and some birds on top
     
  4. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    Really nice looking weld.

    If it can be avoided, there's good reason to avoid welding any more of that plate, as it'll be very difficult to stop it distorting.
     
  5. andyroo54

    andyroo54 Member

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    What do you mean by this?
     
  6. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    I think it means he doesn't know what he's talking about ;)
     
  7. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    What? There's a tiny bit on the top edge of the fillet weld - you'd want to be pretty damn anal to regard that as excessive slag :p
     
  8. andyroo54

    andyroo54 Member

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    This is what I was wondering, it's a preference thing not a necessity.
     
  9. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    I prefer to think of it as stitch welding, so no.

    There's no need to weld it all the way around, it's secure enough as is.

    That's not slag, all the slag has been chipped away, bar any slag inclusions in the bead itself. I didn't do this to win any competitions, I just wanted my bird bath stand to stay together.
     
    Last edited: Jul 4, 2011
  10. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    I'm not worried about feedback, but thanks anyway. Here's the same bead. The first pic is with some slag along the top edge. The second pic is with that bit of slag removed.

    The cheap-arsed welding machine that I bought is far more capable than I am.

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]
     
  11. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    He'd removed 99.5% of the slag, the weld looked pretty damn nice - good bead profile, no undercut, no worm-holing and minimal visible inclusions. Talk of removing slag seemed pretty pointless.
     
  12. OP
    OP
    Archades

    Archades Member

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    grinder/sander :tongue:
    Thanks 1shot:D Got any SHS 2-3mm you could try? would love to see how it goes.
     
  13. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    Go easy guys, IntelInside probably mistook the heat affected zone for slag. The Cylinder to plate weld (middle pic, post #41) sure looks to have a load of slag on it to me.
    Surely you can say 'it's not slag' without throughing a hissy-fit?

    2.
     
  14. MyDixiesNormous

    MyDixiesNormous Member

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    It was the pretense of knowing what he was talking about, while also obviously not knowing what he was talking about that rubbed up some people, including me, the wrong way.
     
  15. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    OK. It's NOT SLAG in that pic. The patch of black at the base of the weld is soot and is not actually on the weld. The only slag is a bit on the top edge and another tiny bit at the start.

    I'm sorry if I'm a bit blunt with this, but for anyone who has actually done some stick welding, it's bloody obvious.
     
  16. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    For my birdbath stand, I'm not that concerned.

    At the moment, no.
     
  17. Betzie

    Betzie Member

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    Just a tip with cheap or lowish power welders,


    Duty cycle is usually limited (should be stated somewhere in the manual), so best to startup, run a few test welds to get your settings, weld your job in small sections within the machines stated duty cycle.

    Eg:

    50% duty @ 140amps = approx 30mis at that amps

    If the machine gets hot, your welds will suffer.

    Also, it is worth using the mini disposable gas bottles, they work fine and if your welds are exposed to weather will last longer as any residual flux is porous and tends to be a corrosion point.

    Have fun :)
     
  18. TERRA Operative

    TERRA Operative Member

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    Duty cycle is based on a 10 minute period.

    Ie. 50% duty cycle = 5 minutes on, 5 minutes off.

    Whether the machine gets hot is irrelevant to weld quality. All welders these days have over temp protection (particularly the inverter units) and as such will automatically shut down if they get too hot (which will blow input diodes, IGBT's, or output diodes on the older transformer units), switching the weld output back on when they cool down again.
     
    Last edited: Jul 5, 2011
  19. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

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    Yup. As an example, my machine has a 25% duty cycle at (I think) 80 amps. The higher the amps, the lower the duty cycle.

    If it gets too hot, tho', it'll just shut down until it cools enough to keep working. I've only had that happen a couple of times and that was when I first got it and was going stupid. With my recent job on the staino, it was never a concern.
     
  20. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    Careful - that's sounding like a hissy-fit.
    Fine. What it is and what it looks like, can depend a lot on the skill of the photogapher.
    That is now clear.

    I've done a crap load of stick welding and your photo was not immediately obvious to me. I've still got a couple of stick welders; I keep them for hard facing.

    One final question: you are quite happy with the weld and say "I'm not worried about feedback,", so why post the pic?
    (I'm not being critical of the weld. It's not a thing of beauty, but it will get the job done).
     

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