1. OCAU Merchandise now available! Check out our 20th Anniversary Mugs, Classic Logo Shirts and much more! Discussion here.
    Dismiss Notice

Welders for noobs

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by Archades, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. 1shot1kill

    1shot1kill Member

    Joined:
    Jun 3, 2003
    Messages:
    8,962
    Location:
    Where the wild things are
    RussellK did none of that. A lack of basic reading comprehension seems to be the issue here.
     
  2. RussellK

    RussellK Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    511
    If you have that experience with welding, then you should be able to recognise the profile and symmetry of a fillet weld. The soot out from the base of the weld is clearly sitting on flat plate, not on weld material, and looks nothing like the slag you get on a stick weld.

    That said, a lot of people who only MIG weld don't have the eye for a good weld, as a MIG will put down a nice-looking bead regardless of whether the joint prep and speed/volt controls were correctly set for good penetration and strength. There's good reason why expert welders regard MIG as a "metal squirt gun".
     
  3. Mathuisella

    Mathuisella Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2002
    Messages:
    7,540
    Location:
    in your gearbox...grindin
    Quoted for truth. I've stuck with Arc for all my weld except for a couple when i borrowed a mate's mig when i was out of rods. The mig felt weird, yet provided an ok weld.

    I want to get into tig for more intricute work though.
     
  4. mils1

    mils1 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,028


    Speed is the key when production requires it. Twin Pulse MIG machines with real time synergic computers are far from squirt guns. I have owned a Fabrication shop for nearly 9 years, I am certified in Pressure Vessel Welding for TIG MIG & Stick, I have done welding for 15 years, first 4 years was 99.99% Stainless steel, purge welding food grade tube & fittings etc

    Cheap machines = coarse adjustments, i.e 40-50-60-70 amp adjustments

    Expensive machines = really fine adjustments, i.e 40-41-42-43-44 & real time voltage regulation etc.

    Advice when buying a welding machine is don't buy unless it has at least 3 years warranty
     
  5. OP
    OP
    Archades

    Archades Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    Messages:
    1,960
    Location:
    Jeebus Land
    Thankyou:D

    What are those twin pulse mig jobbies worth just outa curiosity, and whats the most expensive form of welding?
     
  6. mils1

    mils1 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,028
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  7. bl4ck32

    bl4ck32 Member

    Joined:
    Aug 3, 2005
    Messages:
    4,522
    Location:
    local
    Depends on the welder size, as they range. When i was looking a little while ago the entry level commercial ones I used for work started at around 2.5K.

    TIG welding titanium would be expensive, but TIG itself isnt the most expensive. Expense comes down to material, and consumables used.

    Also, lol at some of the keyboard welders. Appears only a few have worked in the industry who gave advice.
     
  8. OP
    OP
    Archades

    Archades Member

    Joined:
    Oct 26, 2005
    Messages:
    1,960
    Location:
    Jeebus Land
    Sounds like an expensive hobby:p But I spose you buy a decent one and it lasts 20-40 years?

    Lots of experts in here:p I'm just happy to see the cheapie does alright.
     
  9. Ch4iS

    Ch4iS Member

    Joined:
    Jul 2, 2008
    Messages:
    828
    Location:
    swsyd
    Wona list the price of those Synergic machines also? They are far from cheap, going into 5 figures last I remember.
     
    Last edited: Jul 8, 2011
  10. mils1

    mils1 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,028
    18k each, not cheap at all
     
  11. RussellK

    RussellK Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    511
    At that price I'd expect the machine to be doing the welding for you.
     
  12. Betzie

    Betzie Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Messages:
    774
    Just snagged a little mig today, $850 on special

    http://www.unimig.com.au/catalogue_product.asp?product=32&category=1&subcategory=2

    In all honesty I wouldnt buy anything less powerfull or cheaper than this machine.

    Back in the day before inverters were common the SiP Coppermate and the WIA machines were the pick of the compact models, BOC sells a decent compact machine the MAGMATE 180 but I like the torch that comes with the UNI Mig
     
  13. mils1

    mils1 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,028
    Titanium needs to be induction heated & welded in a 100% oxygen free environment.
     
  14. RussellK

    RussellK Member

    Joined:
    Jun 11, 2003
    Messages:
    511
    That's an excellent price - I paid about that for the previous model in the 165A size. I like the addition of digital displays and the spool gun connection on the new model.

    As for the "I wouldn't buy anything smaller", can I ask what it is people actually weld? In addition to the MIG, a lot of the time I use a BOC Smootharc 130 inverter slung over my shoulder.

    With a 3.2mm stick on about 110 amps, it does sections up to 4-5mm no problem, above that a root gap or bevel and multiple passes does the job fine. Are people routinely welding 8mm+ sections with their 200A welders or am I missing something?
     
  15. Betzie

    Betzie Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Messages:
    774
    I'm a fitter and turner, not a welder so I'm not challenging what you have said but I was under the understanding it can be done without a sealed chamber. I have seen someone weld it in a special gas bath in his welding cell.

    Most interesting type of welding I have seen is tripple head sub arc, the transformers are huge to run 24/7

    Refurbing rope sheaves and rope drums for dragline excavators used up to $120,000 worth of wire which I promply machined most of it off :)
     
  16. Betzie

    Betzie Member

    Joined:
    Aug 17, 2004
    Messages:
    774
    Its for a small workshop, not my home garage, but when welding 6-8mm and if you want to do alloy or stainless it pays to have a bit of head room.

    Being a fitter I do not weld every day but when I need to it usually means it has some structural or strength requirement and when I weld it I want it to stay welded :)


    130 inverter MMA/TIG are great general purpose but I find them a bit small to TIG effectivly
     
  17. mils1

    mils1 Member

    Joined:
    Jul 17, 2005
    Messages:
    1,028
    I'm a fitter & machinist by trade aswell, that is the way i TIG weld titanium tube (purged)
     
  18. TERRA Operative

    TERRA Operative Member

    Joined:
    Jul 8, 2005
    Messages:
    6,925
    Location:
    Niraikanai
    Just got myself a free inverter TIG. It's a rubbish current model Chinese made BOC Smootharc TIG 185 unit, but it'll do the job (HF start, yay!) especially seeing as I can get spare parts practically free.

    I already got an older 250A single phase Kemppi/BOC MIG machine and a few cheap and nasty Weldstar 150 stick welders to make one good out of the two (I might populate the board with the extra MOSFET to increase reliability, those Chinese units run the components on the ragged edge of their ratings), so all I need now is a plasma cutter and I'm set. :D
     
  19. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

    Joined:
    Jan 21, 2005
    Messages:
    3,328
    Location:
    Saigon
    Why are you being such a dick?
    My post was after you'd explained there was no slag, but everyone was still ripping into IntelInside.

    I simple looked at your photo and thought that it was not surprising that someone mistook the soot for slag - suddenly it's all my fault.

    2.
     
  20. Mathuisella

    Mathuisella Member

    Joined:
    Dec 3, 2002
    Messages:
    7,540
    Location:
    in your gearbox...grindin
    yummy plasma cutters mmm.....

    so many times one would've been handy to have.

    awkward areas to cut and the only alternative at hand is a chunky angle grinder :(
     

Share This Page

Advertisement: