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Welders for noobs

Discussion in 'Hobby Engineering' started by Archades, Apr 18, 2011.

  1. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    Because you continue to act like a numpty.

    And for the second time, it's not my photo. QED my comment above.
     
  2. frizzl

    frizzl Member

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    Considering the drums themselves are worth well over $1m a piece, they probably didn't mind :p
     
  3. rthy

    rthy Member

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    RISE FROM THE GRAVE!!!

    so, anyone one good with gasless mig's?
    my welds seem to bubble on the surface?
     
  4. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    That's typically called porosity. It can be caused by impurities like paint or oil, but from memory when I used gasless wire, when I encountered porosity I could get rid of it by adjusting the volts or wire speed.
     
    rthy likes this.
  5. rthy

    rthy Member

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    Thanks, I try cleaning up the surface more
    my crappy bunnings welder only has a switch for "low" or "high" volts but adjustable wirespeed
     
  6. ShadowBurger

    ShadowBurger Member

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    how'd you go with the gasless mig? I'm tossing up buying a new welder soon. I have a cheap stick which does okay but I want pretty tig welds so I can make a rear bumper for my 4wd

    Thinking about this: https://www.edisons.com.au/rossi-200amp-tig-arc-mma-inverter-welding-machine/
     
  7. maldotcom2

    maldotcom2 Member

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    Most barwork like that is done with industrial MIG. Of course you can TIG weld it if you have the time and inclination, but proper TIG machines have a foot pedal to control the heat. Most combo machines don't have this. Since you already have a stick welder, you'd be better off spending money on a good dedicated AC/DC TIG welder with foot control. With AC you'll be able to weld Aluminium too.
     
  8. stiben

    stiben Member

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  9. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    That is a very good price. The only thing "missing" is pulse, but that's not really a must-have feature. I like having all the knobs there - beats stepping through options to get to the one you want to adjust on single-knob machines.
     
  10. rthy

    rthy Member

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    went alright but messy af, got a arc welder but i think ill blow holes on this 1-2mm steel
     
  11. dr_deathy

    dr_deathy Member

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    I like the nobs for all the settings vs the stupid menu system they use these days.

    Even enough room to have the symble and in writing what it does!
     
  12. stiben

    stiben Member

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    Got an argon cylinder but not done any TIG welding yet, only stick. This unit is now on sale for $698. And RussellK it has a knob for pulse frequency...
     
  13. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    One tip, make sure you don't set your argon flow too high - obviously you want enough to protect the weld pool, but too high and you tend to burn through a heap when learning.
     
  14. JabTronic

    JabTronic Member

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    My family runs a welding supplies/repairs store, I don't work there (besides helping out over the years) but my line of work involves stainless and aluminium fabrication. I'd always recommend to stay away from cheaper ebay style stuff because they usually come with only 12 month or non existent warranties and with so many Chinese variations you just can't source the parts or mainboards to fix them when they fail. We get so many customers who come in with Rossi or ebay welders hoping we can repair them but it is never economical. In general if looking at cheaper stuff I'd recommend paying a little more for reputable brands such an Everlast or Jasic Unimig.

    I wouldn't recommend the TradeTools unit, looks like it has some decent features (no mention of duty cycle) but only 12 month warranty. Pay a little more and get a Unimig 200a acdc which has a 3 year warranty.
    Also stay away from MIG/TIG combo units as their performance usually isn't that great. If you want a half decent MIG and half decent TIG you're going to have to get two dedicated machines that's just how it is unfortunately.

    My recommendations for cheap units:
    Gas/gasless MIG/STICK: Unimig Razorweld 175. 3 year warranty.
    DC TIG/STICK with high freq start: Everlast PowerARC 160STH and the optional tig torch. 5 year warranty.
    ACDC TIG: Unimig 200a AC/DC. 3 year warranty. Only has 20% duty cycle however.

    Note that these are all 15amp machines, you cannot plug them into a standard 10amp outlet.

    If you want to do a lot of TIG you need to consider a foot pedal.

    My go-to welder which I use at home and work is an Everlast 210 EXT ACDC TIG but it's considerably more expensive then those examples.
    Everlast make great welders for the price, we don't have many issues with them and they have a 5 year warranty. Just check youtube for reviews - the yanks love the Everlast welders for example here's a good review of what the PowerARC 160ST can do stick and TIG.
     
    fredhoon likes this.
  15. hlokk

    hlokk Member

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    Are there any TIG welders worth getting that plug into a 10 amp socket?

    The 15A requirement if you work out of a domestic garage :(
     
  16. dr_deathy

    dr_deathy Member

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    15AMP is cheap when buying a real tig welder (at least $2000 with gas)

    I would get a quote as most welders in the 10AMP range are very basic.
     
  17. maldotcom2

    maldotcom2 Member

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    I just got started with TIG this week. For now I'm using an inverter machine that I bought for stick and plasma processes. It's surprisingly good for what it is. 180 Amps and HF start. Of course I don't have AC or foot pedal but it's fine for a beginner.

    If you're buying a dedicated TIG machine you definitely want AC capability and foot pedal control.
     
  18. RussellK

    RussellK Member

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    "Proper" TIG units are pretty much always 15A plugs, but you can get inverter stick welders up to 130A which have 10A plugs, and some of these have a TIG mode that can be used for scratch start, and 100A is plenty for a lot of TIG work.

    That said, since TIG units are typically run at much lower amps than their max rating (stuff like 6mm aluminium is where you tend to need lots of amps) some people use a short 15A socket to 10A plug plug, but do so at their own risk.
     
  19. miicah

    miicah Member

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    I'm looking at the TradeTools 140amp stick welder as it seems to be what I'm looking for. Basically I want to be able to make my own workbenches and assorted brackets and accessories for my ute.

    Related, how much is steel compared to wood? Like what is a 2m x .6m workbench going to cost me in raw materials?
     

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