Western Digital Working on 20,000 RPM Raptor Drive?

Discussion in 'Storage & Backup' started by DiGiTaL MoNkEY, Jun 7, 2008.

  1. DiGiTaL MoNkEY

    DiGiTaL MoNkEY Inverted Monkey

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    [​IMG]

    Source: http://www.bit-tech.net/news/2008/06/06/western-digital-working-on-20-000-rpm-raptor/1
     
    Last edited: Jun 11, 2008
  2. TX3

    TX3 Member

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    First there was the Raptor, then came the Velociraptor, now, prepare yourself for..... ChuckNorriraptor
     
  3. Reaper

    Reaper Member

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    Did they ever consider making their own ssd's? :D
     
  4. terrastrife

    terrastrife Member

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    considering they have no resources in memory, no :)

    even their hdds have the normal hynic or samsung on board :)
     
  5. eukaryote:)

    eukaryote:) Member

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    I'd worry about the reliability of these drives.... But damn, that is fast. It'd be the industries fastest spinning hard drive. Imagine 200mb/s read speeds and 1ms seeks :eek: Haha i'll wait and see.
     
  6. RnR

    RnR Member

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    Would the heat output be more than twice of the current 10k raptor? The drive could get a little warm...
     
  7. SLATYE

    SLATYE SLATYE, not SLAYTE

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    I wouldn't be too worried. The only things that will get more wear & tear at 20,000RPM are the bearings. Bearing failures are extremely rare on modern HDDs anyway, so that probably won't actually be a problem. The heads and actuators will probably be virtually identical to those used on current HDDs, so that's not a huge problem. The platters will need to be strengthened (to handle the additional forces) but I assume that WD have managed that.
     
  8. ghettro

    ghettro Member

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    I would have thought that WD and other similar companies would have some kind of plan for the inevitable move to SSD?
     
  9. OP
    OP
    DiGiTaL MoNkEY

    DiGiTaL MoNkEY Inverted Monkey

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    Seagate do, as talked about here. No idea what/if WD are going to venture to the SSD game :D
     
  10. dalien

    dalien Member

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    sounds exciting, but i think that the cost will outway the benifits. especially if they are priced around SSD prices.

    Just one question about SSD, how is data recovery on these things??? I would think that if something when wrong, then all is lost. No low level recover or anything?
     
  11. Tornhelm

    Tornhelm Member

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    People are working on SSD recovery, but it is nowhere near as decent as recovery off of traditional hdd drives. From memory it's mainly because of the way SSD's move data around to try and extend the drive life as long as possible.
     
  12. Reaper

    Reaper Member

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    That's another reason why I'll stick to mechanical drives for now. Until they can create flash type memory that doesn't wear out, I won't buy it.
     
  13. SimParadox

    SimParadox Member

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    lol - I think I prefer Tyrannoraptor.
     
  14. Whisper

    Whisper Member

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    I have to ask, are there any 20,000 RPM drives in the Enterprise space?

    If not, I'd think it'd be a good idea to ask why!
     
  15. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    In the enterprise space if you want more speed, you add more disks. No enterprise if going to want a really fast 140GB drive (or 300). They want really fast AND sizeable quantity.

    Also I/O's (more important to enterprise than sequential read/write speeds) scale better with more disks rather than faster single disks.
     
  16. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    You ask why, I'd ask why not :leet:
     
  17. Alpha2k6

    Alpha2k6 Member

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    I think ive heard about 18K RPM discs somewhere.. but not sure who made those.
     
  18. tensop

    tensop Member

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    which is why enterprise grade drives are 74/150gb etc :lol:
     
  19. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    If you want lots of storage you go 'tier 2' and make use of regular SATA drives in 500/750/1000 sizes. FOr utmost speed 'tier 1' 15K SCSI/Fibre Channel is the go, and yeah those drives still top out at 300GB.
     
  20. HeatVision

    HeatVision Member

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    That's just not gonna happen with NAND based flash. Maybe some kind of quantum dot memory in 20 years...
     

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