What size hole for 2.5mm2 t&e

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by xc351, May 5, 2021.

  1. xc351

    xc351 Member

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    Just gotta buy a holesaw/drill to drill through some brick. Just wonder if 16mm will do or if 20mm is the go.

    Plus I gotta see if I can find my sds drill
     
  2. HSV_Enigma

    HSV_Enigma Member

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    I'd say to get an electrician but apprently you are one, so you should find a good electrician.
     
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  3. OP
    OP
    xc351

    xc351 Member

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    I'm much happier playing with 11-110kv+ cables, I never do domestic work (hell I'm still on the same roll of 2.5mm2 I bought 10years + ago) and was on the way home. But non the less 16mm worked tight but worked.
     
  4. zero_velocity

    zero_velocity Member

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    Thats because HV electricians work with 'plug 'n' play' kits, with all the technical work done by engineers and equipment/materials covered by manufacturers/suppliers.

    Tell them what you are doing, get a kit to do it all. There is no need to really think about what is required, the focus is on the worksmanship.
     
  5. ArmoureD

    ArmoureD Member

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    Shit where did my post go?
     
  6. RobRoySyd

    RobRoySyd Member

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    If you want it to look like an electrician did it 16mm. If you want it to look like it was done by someone with a view to the future 20mm.
    If you had a clue about drilling holes through bricks then you would have known a hole saw is the wrong tool, they're only for timber.
    If you want to drill a really big hole through masonry then a diamond core drill is the go or else carefully remove a brick by grinding the mortar
    out around the brick.
     
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  7. DangerMaus

    DangerMaus Member

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    The wood holesaws are for wood :p. You can get masonry holesaws...
     
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  8. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    You can get 20mm Masonry drill bits , I would have through that a hole saw was not deep enough for a full brick they are around 100mm + one or render on both sides.
     
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  9. DangerMaus

    DangerMaus Member

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    Depends on the hole saw and shank length.
     
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  10. Butcher9_9

    Butcher9_9 Member

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    I would still go the drill bit. Hole saws are generally more expensive and assuming the cutter depth of the hole saw was not the full ~130mm you would have to attack it several times to get all the way through knocking out the core each time. pain in the ass. Also drill bits have better chip clearance at least in my experience.

    Don't get me wrong I like holes saws , they are just better suited for shallow large diameter holes.
     
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  11. DangerMaus

    DangerMaus Member

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    Yes if you use one designed for shallow large diameter holes you're going to have issues. A drill bit will generally be cheaper though.
     
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  12. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    It got Agged.... it is like getting Zucked but cooler.


    Personally I always have a range of Masonry sds plus bits in my kit
     
    Last edited: May 17, 2021
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  13. Symon

    Symon Castigat ridendo mores

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    To be fair that's really all that jointers need to know. Liney's aren't that much better, they just get a better tan.
     
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  14. Sunder

    Sunder Member

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    I'm no sparky either, but against anything abrasive, wouldn't you want to put conduit through first, then feed the cable through that?

    Or do I tend to over-engineer stuff, because most my >48v electrical stuff is on moving stuff like eBikes and electric motorcycles?
     
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  15. OP
    OP
    xc351

    xc351 Member

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    My brick work is rather soft a Masonary drill makes a mess on exit. A diamond tipped holesaw is much cleaner yea it's 2 step. and gotta punch out the core but for 1 or 2 holes I prefer it.

    As for using conduit through a hole it's totally overkill on a cable that will never move.

    Oh and you guys are mostly correct we either get everything handed to us ready to go or call up. Only time I need to work something out if it doesn't go to plan to help pin point issues.

    Testing cables/equipment at 500A+ or 100kv+ is nothing out of the norm for me. The test card/procedure will tell you if it's failed or passed.
     
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