What's the name of this connector? (DC, 2 pin, rectangular)

Discussion in 'Electronics & Electrics' started by blankpaper, Jul 19, 2020.

  1. blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    I have a submersible pump with a connector to the DC adapter. The connector is rectangular 2-pin. There's a notch so it can only be inserted one way, pins are 7mm apart, about 8mm long. Female connector width is about 14mm. I see the female end advertised as a 'car cooler' plug (e.g. https://www.banggood.com/2M-12V-DC-...ble-Plug-Wire-p-1030812.html?cur_warehouse=CN)

    I want the male connector (see photos below, the connector is embedded into the DC adapter) to put on the end of a new DC adapter, or later, other bits to power it from solar. The current DC adapter gets crazy hot and doesn't fill me with confidence. Hoping I can find it and order it from element14 or RS Online.


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    Actually, while I'm at it, can anyone guide me as to specs for a solar panel to power this? DC adapter output is 12v 0.9a. I don't need a battery; just if there's sufficient sunlight then it works, and if there's not, then it doesn't. Since no battery, I'm guessing I don't need a charge controller, so pretty much any 12v solar panel > 11w or so should be fine?

    Thanks!
     
    Last edited: Jul 19, 2020
  2. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Coincidentally I think I'm now looking for pretty well the same thing. If I Extractus Digitalus and find one before you I'll let you know, inna meantime I'll lurk in here...

    As far as a solar panel - something that puts out well over 20 watts @ 12 volts would be minimum, maybe more depending on what your pump actually eats under load.

    Ideally something crackerdog bigger so you could run a regulator and a battery as well perhaps, while you've harvesting photons to run that thing during the day go bigger to feed a reasonable battery battery as well - lights and the pump at night might be pretty and gain you bonus credits from the Missus... ;)

    Maybe not as nuts as the used 260-ish watt panels I scored At The RIght Price, that'll end up having reasonable solar regulators (cheap evilBay auctions wins...) on them, to feed batteries that'll be running LED lighting outside under the carport and in the shed and garage.
     
  3. OP
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    blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    The bit that took me a while to learn is that a lot of panels are advertised as 18V but say it can be used with 12V devices. The explanation I read (https://electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/160507/how-to-keep-solar-panel-voltage-at-24v, see the accepted solution) said that as soon as a load is attached that the voltage drops 'automatically' (for the want of a better word). So the panels I'm seeing a lot of are 18V and various wattage, e.g 18V 1.66A (=30W). I don't see any real details to suggest what the output could be at 12V so am I right assuming that if this is the potential at 18V then at 12V it should be closer to 2.5A? (12V x 2.5A = 30W)

    Embarrassingly I did actually study some electronics but that was moons ago.

    You've given me ideas about garden lighting now, so perhaps you're onto something - get a bigger panel and then I can do other stuff as well....
     
  4. fad

    fad Member

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    That looks like a 240v plug
     
  5. OP
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    blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    What it looks like is a big JST connector, but the ones I've seen are really small and commonly used on RC cars apparently.

    I must have browsed thousands of connectors on element14, RS online and various others, and still can't find it. I think I might just buy a few male/female sets of standard barrel-type DC connectors and be done with it.
     
  6. mtma

    mtma Member

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    I think it's either a proprietary derivation of the IEC C1 plug or #23 on this page.

    But seems like it's probably a solder fly wires to and silicone job, if you want to use that power supply.
     
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  7. OP
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    blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    Wow thanks - I think you're right about #23 on that page. Looks exactly it to me. My eyeballing 7mm wasn't far off the 7.6mm, and no wonder I couldn't find spec, it doesn't seem to have any name or owner.

    What would motivate a company to use something so obscure? Is there some royalty they pay to use a certain connector? Surely it's more difficult than just ordering thousands of known, standardised connectors?
     
  8. mtma

    mtma Member

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    Sometimes there are royalties but I think in this case it was originally some connector that you would find in home appliances for DC things like connecting to speakers and halogens, Christmas lights etc, and it probably has just stuck around in certain applications until today. It makes sense that a DC connector shouldn't be compatible with the high voltage AC sockets that are actually standardised.

    When you're making tens of thousands of your own thing, the cost economy of conforming to standards start to not matter so much. As you can see most of the cables are over-moulded, or in the case of the power supply it's moulded into the casing. They would have had to make their moulding dies at some point in time anyway. As you found with the fridges that supposedly use it, it's not like it's 'obscure' as such from a production point of view, but it is just a funny size.

    Some companies start using these design differences to lock people into their systems, that's why with light bulbs standards in both household and cars were mandated - because it became too big of a hindrance to have a huge number of proprietary variations.
     
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  9. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Advertised as to operate in that manner, personally I have doubts the Seller has a clue. Yup, solar panels do work that way (open voltage then loaded voltage at nominated load current draw) but that's basically Snake Oil advertising, and/or the Seller has NFI what they've got there...

    "automatically"?? NFI what they're selling...
    and needs a sane regulator added. Technical diatribe as below...



    Yeeeees, but that's where one of these would get interesting for your pump there.

    If the pump draws... call it an amp at max loading (nice round figure...) based on your plugpack details, then connecting it to that panel the voltage will still be sitting up at 18 volts, because you're not loading it down hard enough for the output power draw to result in it dropping to 12 volts. You'd need to load that panel down with a 2.5 amp drain for 12 volts - two-and-a-half pumps. Got half pump?...

    Basically think of the panel operation there as an unregulated power supply, because that's how unregulated power sources work - it's got output power capability of X watts, but the output volts is directly based on the output current, ie P=IV.

    Which in this case results in Not Enough I, Excessive V.

    Your pump is rated as 12 volts,
    which means it "should" cheerfully chug away happily on 13.8 volts without letting the Angry Blue Genie out. But it's a rigged coin toss whether it'd have long life expectancy feeding it 18 volts - I wouldn't.

    And even adding a battery charging load to it, I still wouldn't. Don't forget for a nominal 12 volt device your battery would need 13.8 or so for proper charging, (unless you want to ponce about with Lithiums instead of lead acid or SLA etc...).

    Hunt around for either a small solar regulator that has the fixed 12 volt output your pump wants (or even make yourself a 12 volt regulator if you want to go all Geek...), or guesstimate your lighting power requirements and upscale everything and use a bigger panel with extra battery charge capacity.

    As an aside here, Point to Note on solar panels as well (aka Trap For Young Players) - that max Voltage/power rating will only be when it's in direct harsh sunlight. The available output power levels will change as the sun moves from creeping up just over the horizon to directly overhead and back to creeping below the other horizon.

    Which will also result in the voltage presented to the pump doing a 1 volt, then 2 volts, 3 volts ad infinitum until where's enough solar voltage/power output to actually kick the pump over . This may
    (or may not) be a Bad Thing for it, m'kay?
     
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  10. OP
    OP
    blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    I thought about my wording after my post and had walked away from the computer. Obscure was probably the wrong word. It seems Waeco use it for their car fridges as do other brands. I wondered to myself if perhaps one company used it for fridges, had some good success, then others copied if only to allow switching brands easier for the consumer without changing plugs. Such a small detail may not cross their minds but I was pondering because it seems to be some sort of adopted car fridge connector.

    Fair point on what you say about "they're making dies for the housing/case anyway, no big deal adding in whatever connector housing they decide to use". Not exactly burdensome for me to get different connectors but also a bit of a shame, I quite like this connector - it's idiot proof one-way insertable and fits snugly.

    Appreciate the patient reply. Obviously I need to do more reading and a bit of planning what it is I really want to connect up and go from there :thumbup:
     
  11. merlin13

    merlin13 Member

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    Just scrolled though the Wes Components online catalogue, they ain't got one of these...
     
  12. mtma

    mtma Member

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    If you're really adventurous then you could probably chuck some Tamiya crimp pins or similar into a 3D printed mould and make something out of some Sika 252 or better yet a proper 2 part product with a higher hardness.

    Preventing the flooding of the female pin would be a bit problematic.

    Probably actually cost you over $60 before you made your first acceptable product but :lol:
     
  13. OP
    OP
    blankpaper

    blankpaper Member

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    I did consider 3d printing something out of stubbornness ("damn it I'll get this connector even if I have to make it myself!") :lol:
     
  14. /invariance\

    /invariance\ Member

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