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When is consumer 10GbE going to happen?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Smokin Whale, Sep 21, 2014.

  1. evilasdeath

    evilasdeath Member

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    While this is a problem its more a factor of lack of demand, very few people want 10g copper.

    In the consumer space there are very few devices that have 10g copper, let alone have the capability to push it beyond 1gbit and see benefits in it.

    In the enterprise side its much the same

    The place that 10g+ is getting used heavily is in datacentres, but they want high density and low power, and power is mentioned again, i think its more the fact that dcs dont like copper interconnects either, you can put a lot more fibre into a rack compared to copper, even within the rack its easier to route and manage fibre vs copper. As such the development of 10g has been mostly towards fibre vs copper
     
  2. cvidler

    cvidler Member

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    yeah 1100 is rrp.


    one thing to look for when scoping old gear is what modules they take.

    There's been more than a few standards over the years. X2, XFP, SFP+.

    SFP+ has 'won'. Resulting in the cheaper and more readily available modules.

    X2 and XFP are still around, but are usually more expensive and harder to find.

    tl;dr; get a switch that uses SFP+ modules.
     
  3. Copie

    Copie Member

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    Well that and also module brands matter some don't play well with other brands either
     
  4. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

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  5. OP
    OP
    Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    Is there a particular reason why the "HP 10GB MELLANOX CONNECTX-2" is quite cheap at the moment? Seems like there are some companies dumping stock.
     
  6. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

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    If I had to guess its because Mellanox have now recently stopped selling QDR IB adapters and switches and most of the IB cards were 40GbIB / 10GbE capable, and I'm guessing that these 10GbE standalone network cards were part of the same "technology family" and hence they also get to be junked as well. Although this is probably good news for people that wish to purchase them both cheap and new right now. Their base IB cards are now FDR speeds of 56GbIB / 40GbE.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    Yeah definitely, I'm thinking of purchasing a couple for the new office. Pretty crazy that they are already pumping out dual 100Gbe cards in their new line, that's enough to easily saturate a 16x PCIe 3.0 slot (assuming full duplex with traffic going both ways).
     
  8. fad

    fad Member

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    This is where NBASE-T might help. It should require the same spec cables. With just a bit more speed. So 80m+ lengths should be fine, but it will only be 2.5gbit or 5gbit.

    However I don't know when it will turn up. I think until the war is won and they start producing Intel NICS on desktops with this, it wont go far. There are two competing standards. NBASE-T vs MGBASE-T
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    Very interesting, thanks for sharing. Classic format wars. It's pretty clear that with fibre internet speeds and 4k VR around the corner, 1GB LAN isn't going to cut it anymore (and definitely is an issue for most people who work with multimedia on a network). 2.5Gbit or 5Gbit would be plenty for most households and compatible with the existing internal wiring.
     
    Last edited: Mar 17, 2016
  10. fad

    fad Member

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    Nbase-T seems like the obvious choice, its the same protocol as 1GBase-T with a faster clock. Uses the same wiring type as 1Gbe and will support previous versions. So a Nbase-T device will connect to a 1Gbe device.

    The cons are Broadcom is in the MGbase camp. Considering they are a huge player, they have alot of weight.

    It also turns out these two camps have forced the IEEE to ratify a standard. So they have announced 2.5Gbase-T and 5Gbase-T. Expect to see something in 24 months.
     
  11. OP
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    Smokin Whale

    Smokin Whale Member

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    24 months can't come soon enough.
     
  12. HobartTas

    HobartTas Member

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    Yes but I don't think your going to be pumping stuff out at that speed on a sustained basis and what can receive 100 Gb's a second other than a ramdrive or a high end SAN. I think in most cases people are trying to utilise the higher speeds to somewhat mitigate latencies that already exist elsewhere like this here (although probably not the best example I can think of, kindly read the entire thread to understand the problem they had).

    Most people seem to be quite happy with the 53Mb's a second they get off the wireless home router, let alone the 1Gb's from the cat 6 cable.

    These 2.5 and 5.0 speed hardware's were supposed to be coming a couple of years ago and nothing has happened yet. Enterprise users probably won't bother with it because anyone that needed more than the 1 Gb's they get on copper probably already got transitioned to 10 GbE on fibre a long time ago.

    If you look at home users and my previous comment about speeds then what are retailers going to sell? a mix of 1.0 and 2.5/5.0 speed hardware? or are they going to stop selling the 1.0 stuff and replace it altogether with 2.5/5.0 stuff at say a 20% price premium as what retailer wants to sell order/store/sell two SKU's of low margin stuff?

    I know people say that the 2.5/5.0 gear is faster (which it is, and backwards compatible) but even though I could also use it, its really neither here nor there. What I want is to do is something like the following and I will most likely buy the QDR infiniband cards to do something like this for my PC's.

    (1) Remove the local boot SSD entirely, insert the IB card and boot drive C: off an image stored on a ZFS NAS so essentially all the PC's will be diskless workstations much like when 20 years ago people used to insert a boot chip onto the vacant spot on a NE2000 network card in their DOS machine and boot remotely off an image stored on a Netware server.

    (2) Create a small but fast ZFS NAS that probably has a half dozen SSD's in Raid-Z2 and all the PC's boot images and VM's are stored just on this. I can snapshot everything on a regular basis and I don't need to bother with (a) cloning the boot drive in case it dies as that is what the ZFS Raid-Z2 will be there for to prevent, (b) backing up anything as it will already be done with the snapshotted disk images that will periodically also be copied to the spinners and (c) worry about Cryptolocker type viruses as I can always go back to a previous version. Other bulk data can be stored on spinners also in Raid-Z2 either on the same NAS or probably a separate one that's not on all the time.

    In case anyone thinks this scenario is a bit "out there" I'm not the only one asking and someone else is already doing this.

    Cheers
     
  13. MoRpHeUs

    MoRpHeUs Member

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    So in summary 2 years later still no consumer priced 10Gbe as per original thread starter?
     
  14. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Demand will often drive competition which in turn drives down price.

    The demand for 10Gbe at a consumer level is low. Most users rely on connectivity via either their ISP supplied modem and wifi. Users who need speed move to Gbe but generally the need for consumer 10Gbe is very low i would think.
     
  15. nav

    nav Member

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    Thanks for the thread revival, made for pretty interesting reading. :thumbup:
    See you all in 24 months !

    -nav.
     
  16. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    I can fill 100Gbs in compute clusters very easily when going from ram to ram or gpu to gpu. its a significant bottleneck really.
     
  17. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Running that Token Ring are we?
     
  18. Hive

    Hive Member

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    We probably won't see it mainstream until 2020.

    If you want 10G on the cheap - there's always IP over infiniband, or CX-4 crap (think 802.3ak?)
     
  19. evilasdeath

    evilasdeath Member

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    should we start a thread for when will we see 100g in consumer cheap?
     
  20. Hive

    Hive Member

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    Last edited: Mar 23, 2016

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