Where do you buy knives from?

Discussion in 'Geek Food' started by lawrencep93, Dec 26, 2018.

  1. lawrencep93

    lawrencep93 Member

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    Trying to look for a decent knife or two to add to my collection. I want something super sharp to cut veg, fruit and raw meat.

    I looked at Japanese demascus steel based ones but the only decent ones I could find where extremely expensive.

    Are there any good knifes for no more than $100 each?
     
  2. caspian

    caspian Member

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  3. DangerMaus

    DangerMaus Member

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    Tojiro make nice entry level knives, still a bit over a $100 though.

    Is Sakai Jikko a rebranded Yoshihiro or vice versa? Looks identical to the Yoshihiro VG-10 hammered Damascus.

    Might be like the Hattori VG10 clones?
     
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    lawrencep93

    lawrencep93 Member

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    They look much better than the ones I found, I guess I could get one really good $200 knife now and take good care of it.

    Should I also buy a sharpening stone for it?
     
  5. scared&profane

    scared&profane Member

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    Have a look at this ebay seller - bluewayjapan

    They have some great stuff that isn't too expensive.
     
  6. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    A stone is a long way down the list. You absolutely must, MUST have a honing steel, and MUST use it though. If you're not using a honing steel properly and regularly there is no point in having decent knives.

    For my money I'd get a steel and one good chefs knife. You probably should go and try a few different chefs knives with different profiles out, japanese chef's knives tend to have a very straight edged profile which doesnt suit everyone's style.
     
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    lawrencep93

    lawrencep93 Member

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    That's a good point hence why I wanted to start with one that isn't too expensive.

    Maybe I should look at other knifes not demascus steel Japanese knifes to add to my set, the main thing is I want something sharper to cut veggies finer and also cut sushimi I get ultra fine, my current knifes are great for veggies and meat but just don't get the best result and I need to constantly sharpen them
     
  8. scared&profane

    scared&profane Member

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    It's worth getting some sharpening lessons - particularly learning to 'feel the burr' (and remove it with a strop).

    As far as sharp knives go - i've been through mundials, glabals, furis and the like but by far the sharpest knife i have (that hold the edge best too) is this one. High carbon steel does take a bit more maintenance to keep it from rusting, but i find it totally worth it!
     
  9. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Couple of points lawrencep93 that you might already be well aware of, so please dont take it amiss if I'm preaching to the choir, but it hasnt been mentioned yet in this thread so it seems worthwhile. The purpose of honing, using a honing steel, is to *keep the edge sharp* so you dont need to sharpen it. In effect every single time you use the edge you're rolling it over somewhat, using a honing steel realigns that edge so it's straight. Repeated use of a knife, no matter how hard the steel is, means you keep folding that edge over microscopically and it gets blunter over time as it folds on itself. Sharpening means grinding that material away to produce a new edge. You want to minimise how often you need to do that, you're reducing the life of your knife. When you hone you roll the existing edge back into place, when you sharpen you remove material and create a new edge. Good practice is to use a steel every time you pick your knife up. For a home cook, probably fine to do it once a day unless you're doing something significant like breaking down a whole primal cut of meat.

    "Sharpening" as in with a stone should be a once or twice a year operation for a professional chef when you've got good steel.

    EDIT - Most importantly, this is all true whether you've got a fifty dollar furi with godawful soft steel or a multi hundred dollar japanese or german knife with hard steel, it still needs the same care.
     
  10. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    With that in mind though, given you're in vic, are you in melbourne? If you are, tram yourself to south melbourne, make a nuisance of yourself at Chef's Hat, and try a few blades out. The sales people know their shit, their prices are not extraordinary but nor are they exorbitant, see what you like. If you find something you like I recommend checking overseas pricing with shipping, knives are often cheaper shipped from the states or hongkong. And bear in mind that even if you buy a $200aud knife, it probably wont be the last time in your life you buy a $200aud knife, this is quite a rabbit hole to go down :)

    EDIT - If in qld the same can be said of some of the king of knives, though they're franchises so they vary drastically, and their prices are bloody awful. If you're after F.Dick knives, which I love to pieces, the aus distributor is the hospitality distribution giant Nisbets (who sell to the public)

    EDIT 2 - And if you're shopping for one good knife, and I think you should, a 20cm/8inch chefs knife is about right for *most* mens hands for most purposes. It's not entirely about the size of your hands though, how you tend to grip the handle is equally important, there are guys with huge hands for whom a shorter knife works better, and people with small hands for whom a longer knife works better. Suck it and see.
     
    Last edited: Dec 27, 2018
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    lawrencep93

    lawrencep93 Member

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    I'm from Melbourne will have to go visit that place.

    Also great point with the honing steel, I never knew to do that daily.

    I do use knifes daily as I usually cook fresh daily, although I will have some heavier days.

    I might get a good quality honing steel and a decent quality knife to start with then add the extras on down the track.

    I might start with 20cm chef knife and see how I go, maybe start with something a little cheaper and learn if I like that style then add to the collection
     
  12. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Just talking more generally about chefs knives btw, and here we're going entirely into taste territory... Japanese chef's knives *tend to* have a really straight blade profile and a fairly thin knife stock. Here's a random example of a shun knife from google image search that illustrates (not trying to recommend knives here, just illustrate style):

    [​IMG]

    To compare to a far more curved, rockable style that german knives often have (this is a Zwilling JA Henckels Pro) (I can think of exceptions to both, but it is typical):

    [​IMG]

    So depending on your style of how you use your knife, the former or latter blade profile might suit you better and that's something to experiment with a bit.

    Both of these examples have a decent handle, with a bolster (the thickened part of steel butting up against the handle) that's pretty solid. One thing I personally cant stand is this, which wusthof do with their knives:

    [​IMG]

    The fact that bolster extends right down to the heel of the blade makes it really bloody difficult to keep a consistent edge on the heel of the knife. Personally I use the heel a lot for tougher chopping jobs, so it matters to me, prefer the style of the zwilling knife above where you can keep a consistent heel edge right to the handle. F.Dick's 1905 series chefs knife is the same as the zwilling in that regard.

    Japanese style chefs knives are bloody king for getting really nice consistent thin slices (Which, if you consider japanese cuisine, go figure) but I dont find they suit my general style as much, so if I only had one knife I'd not reach for one. Get three chefs together you'll have a good argument on it for several hours.

    But there you go, few points to consider as you shop. I give it about a week before this gets done for hotlinking random images :p

    EDIT - And dont underestimate how important it is that the handle is comfortable in your hand! It matters, you're potentially going to be using the thing for hours. Handles are important, and very personal.

    EDIT 2 - And really a japanese knife evangelist should post a rebuttal to this, because their points are equally valid and I cant argue it for them adequately :p
     
    Last edited: Dec 29, 2018
  13. cmi83

    cmi83 Member

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    I have some good Japanese blades, and looking to purchase one or two from Baz. However, for general use the Aldi ones (http://offers.kd2.org/en/us/aldi/pbiZG/) are fantastic.

    These get abused hard.. left soaking in water, sharpened on a diamond steel only once a month and they still cut tomatoes with ease
     
  14. killedbycrimson

    killedbycrimson Member

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    I make my own. I forge my own damascus, I use Vtoku 2 and like carbon steel. @bencuttsknifeworks on insta or facey.
    Most of the time your looking at about 500$ for damascus and cladded steel because of the time spent making it. Pure carbon is going to work a treat too, its easier to keep sharp, just needs a bit more care when cleaning and storing.
     

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  15. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    One of these days when I'm made of money, killedbycrimson, you shall be getting a call :p
     
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  16. killedbycrimson

    killedbycrimson Member

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    I do reclaimed saw blade and known carbon steel knives from 150 to 300 depending. My edges tend to be very fine, I grind down to about .10mm.
    Carbon steel really is no different than damascus, it just doesn't look as pretty.
     
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    lawrencep93

    lawrencep93 Member

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    Thanks for all the responses. I hold onto the handle and not do a pinch grip, so that German knife looks like it might be more fitting.

    I am looking at getting a few replica knifes from Ali express to try out the grips and just use for basic things, and to practice honing and sharpening, then I will get something a little more expensive and reserve it for more delicate things
     
  18. Benno1988

    Benno1988 Member

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    I have 6 Wusthof Classic ones as pictured earlier.

    2 X Chef
    1 X Wunder
    3 X Pairing

    I dishwasher them, because busy. Solid knife. Nice balance. Feel sturdy.

    Hated the feel of a Global one, thin light handle. Wusthof feels so solid. I got mine imported from Cutlery and More. Ended up maybe $700 for the 6 plus wooden drawer block and sharpener.
     
  19. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I really don't like the feel of Global handles. they are far too small and taper the wrong way.

    I don't mind dishwasherising knives with suitable handles, as long as they can be held separate and not bang around in the water jets - it's impact that damages the blades. that pretty much eliminate everything I have though, due to handle material.

    absolutely do not do this with carbon steel though, as the alkaline detergent will have them flash rusting. :sick:
     
  20. Benno1988

    Benno1988 Member

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    Yeah for sure. I have a pretty high ende Miele Dishwasher, so they sit on the top cutlery rack and don't bang against anything. Just got sick of handwashing, and sometimes they'd sit there for days. Figure better to wash in diswasher every day than leave dirty :S

    Anyway. Wusthof are a solid choice. If you don't want to spend that much, Mundial are a poor mans Wusthof.
     

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