which lens for Europe

Discussion in 'Photography & Video' started by kelee, May 31, 2009.

  1. Maddog06

    Maddog06 Member

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    As mentioned in my previous post (I think) I spent 8wks or so during mid last year in Europe (Croatia, Vienna, Prague, Germany, Oslo, London). However, at the time I didn't own a DSLR (I do now, after regretting not having purchased one for Europe). The areas visited were mainly full of historical architecure, and I didn't venture out past suburbia. From my experience of the places I have been to, I would really like to go back there with my 10-22mm and 24-105mm. If you're shooting architecture, I would of thought you'd want someone nice and wide? I know that's what I would prefer. Correct me if I'm wrong.

    Earlier this year I went to Malaysia and India. I took with me my 10-22mm & 24-105mm, and left the 70-300mm (aka "doorstop") at home as I knew it would hardly get used and I couldn't justify the extra weight.

    When traveling with camera gear, it really depends on where you stand in terms lugging around weight. Maybe do a trial? Maybe take all the gear you plan on taking, and walk around with it for a day taking shots around your local area. That may help in deciding whether weight is a factor for you. The other thing is, you seem to also have the 17-55mm. The 17-55mm maybe be perfect for your general shooting and keep the wide angle sigma for when it's really needed. But if you really feel you need the 55-250mm, and your wife isn't going to rant all through the trip about having to carry your gear, then by all means why not!

    All the best with your decisions and planning!

    :)
     
  2. adamadam

    adamadam Member

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    I only spent 4 months there, and wished I had a better compact :D
     
  3. adamadam

    adamadam Member

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    Then bought one 6 months after I got back... HAHA
     
  4. Iceman

    Iceman Member

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    This is the key. What you take depends on your shooting style. If you want landscape, your 10-20mm sigma should do the trick. If that's also suitable as a walk around, bonus. If not, chuck in one more. Done.

    Also helps to spend a day walking around with it before you leave to test the weight.
     
  5. Sir Ghallahad

    Sir Ghallahad Member

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    I shall be in Euro in 2 weeks time for a while and I envision having the 17-40 on 5D2 nearly permanently.
     
  6. teegman

    teegman Member

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    I'm in a similar boat - off to Europe in around 12 months and debating what kit to bring / buy / beg for.. ideally I'd like a 17-55 2.8 IS or a 17-85 4-5.6 IS as the main all rounder and am debating whether to add a 10-22 or similar lens to the kit. Steering towards the 17-55 as I reckon the larger aperture will be more beneficial than the extra length, and probably try to fork out for an UWA as the general consensus is that you can't go too wide in Europe.. any thoughts?
     
  7. SyN

    SyN Member

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    what, like my camera? but not as good :p

    woo yeah new firmware for lx3 out!
     
  8. stergiopilus

    stergiopilus Member

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    Yup, the wider the better. It isn't only the landscape, its the tight narrow streets, architecture (old buildings that you want to get as much in the photo as possible) etc. A 10-22mm on a crop camera would be really usefull in Europe.
     
  9. xishnik

    xishnik Member

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    First of all, don't use a camera bag, it's like asking to be robbed! a normal backpack with a small lock on the zipper and a size zippup pocket for extra lens.

    Amsterdam,rome,venice - 10-20 is a must! nothing but tight streets and churches. Work out what ISO you can push your camera to without introducing too much noise for indoor shots.

    Vienna - you can get away with more zoom, but 20mm on crop will probably be your main setting here as well.

    You will not appreciate the power of 10-20 until you travel with it through Europe or Japan. Even for landscape shots and for panoramas, there is nothing quiet like UWA lens.

    a 50m f1.8 or better is a good portrait and low light lens, but the 1.8 is a bit picky with AF as sun goes down! It is light and small on camera so can be used for street and candid. It is too small and light not to take.

    Saying all that I did used 24-105 maybe 35% of the time on my last big trip and 10-20 for the rest.

    Good luck and have fun. do take a P&S with you that has manual controls though.

    GK
     
  10. Iceman

    Iceman Member

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    There's a couple of issues here; average backpacks don't have any padding. The ones that do don't come close to having enough padding to cushion your lens against the shock of putting the bag down. You'll have to pack the parts individually in well padded cases.

    While I agree that shiny new camera bag says = I contain expensive things. It's only going to be an issue if you leave it unattended or you get mugged. In the latter case they'll likely take the bag regardless of what it contains. Run around the corner, toss the content and take what they want.

    You can take some precautions by; buying a backpack camera bag like the flipside and removing the logo / dirtying it up or buying a 'nappy' camera bag. Also while nothing is going to hide the fact that you have an SLR, you can change away from the I'M CANON, STEAL ME strap to a plain black one. Some people have reported success taping up logos and generally making the camera look like a turd on it's last legs but I'd suspect thieves are cottoning onto this by now.
     
  11. f@rmboy

    f@rmboy Terrorist Photographer

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    F@rmboy carried his 5DMkII around the UK in a 10 year old backpack with no padding other than a scrunched up rain jacket.
     
  12. Iceman

    Iceman Member

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    I used to carry my vodka around like that.. After the first time I ended up with a Żubrówka soaked jacket, I decided that perhaps fragile things needed more loving care. The vodka cost $40. The camera costs $4k. I buy lowepro :p
     
  13. Maddog06

    Maddog06 Member

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    I carried my 40D, 10-22mm, 24-105mm + accessories + day gear in a day pack while in Malaysia/India. I left my Lowepro bag back here in Aus thinking a day pack would be enough. Rookie mistake. I'm definitely carrying my gear in a proper camera backpack from now on.

    Normal packs (imo) just don't give enough padding/support for fragile equipment.
     
  14. FB008

    FB008 Member

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    take a leaf from ken rockwell and become a pro just like him
     
  15. Amorphous

    Amorphous Member

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    I have done a lot of backpacking around Europe with a 300D and my main focus was to keep my kit light. The lens that stayed on my camera for maybe 90% of the time was a 10-22. The compact city planning of most cities will require an UWA lens if you want to photograph a whole building, you just wont have the option of taking a step back.

    I also carried a compact, shockproof, waterproof camera on me 24/7. The compact I took everywhere I went and was great for the print-it-and-stick-it-on-your-fridge type shots. The DSLR I took out occasionally and is good for larger prints that end up hanging on the wall.

    I now have a 5DII and have bought lenses to cover a similar range, focussing on lightweight more than maximum aperture. I will be leaving in about a month for six months backpacking around Europe and I will be leaving the telephoto lens at home.
     
  16. hippyhippy

    hippyhippy Member

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    i spent 3 weeks earlier this year .. i had a d90 and tamron 17-50 f2.8 ... there were times i wished i had something wider and something longer ... but overall i didnt want to bringi the 18-200 because of its weight ... worked out well.
     
  17. Usopp

    Usopp Member

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    Think about all the nude beaches in Europe....
     
  18. xishnik

    xishnik Member

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    I've went through snowboarding trips to NZ, AU, France, Japan and Germany as well normal touristy stuff in all of these countries and then some with a non padded backpack with a towel on the bottom and outside parts of it, 400D +24-105 F4 L, 10-20, 50 1.8, two 430ex, tripod, filters, daily snacks and water and some other things and yet to damage anything! you just have to be more careful when using the backpack. the straps side of it is very well padded so place the bag on it when need be. When you have a camera bag it already screams $$$ for taking. When you have a good camera bag it screams $$$$ for taking. When you look like all you could afford is a P&S and have to carry your own water with you, they just ask for your wallet (another reason not to have anything in it but a few bucks and old ID). If you are silly enough to hand in your camera bag on the plane, then you need as much padding as you can buy! But for travel, a good comfortable backpack with good amount of space and well placed pockets is all you need. But hey... if you one of people who buy an expensive race car to have it in your garage and polish it every day and never rev the engine above 3K RPM to keep it in as new condition, no one can help you!

    Have a good trip, and don't worry too much about the gear. There is no such thing as not having correct gear, just not being creative enough! gear helps, but you can still take amazing photos with nothing but a disposable camera or a phone.
     

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