Why does Java suck so much?

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by one4spl, Jun 13, 2008.

  1. Semi-Evolved

    Semi-Evolved Member

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    Globally distributed computers in ten years? People have been predicting that for decades, and it still hasn't happened. I won't hold my breath. And never mind the fact that there exists multitudes of software already in place that won't simply be replaced on a whim, even if what you (or probably more accurately, your hopeful lecturer) predict about software development comes true. COBOL, a forty-nine year old language, still sits at the heart of business logic for a great deal of the world's software. But hey, maybe you're right; maybe in the next decade the entire world will replace it's software with not-yet-developed languages and hardware. :lol:

    That said, even if it does eventuate, all of that is irrelevant to the demands we're putting on computers right now. And those demands require more than a simplistic attitude of "memory management for all". I'm sorry for living in 2008, but that's where I am right now, and pie-in-the-sky hopes for software development's future are more than a little irrelevant to that fact.
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  2. syahrr01

    syahrr01 Member

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    Wait, you're saying that distributed computing renders physical environment resources and technical architecture irrelevant?

    :lol:

    Let's fire all the Enterprise Technical Architects and Virtualization Specialists!!! There's a dozen of these so called experts in this floor alone. We'll replace them with movie-star developers like Luke212 who will use abstraction to make all these hardware and resources problems go away. We'll just describe them in business terms with fluffy visio diagrams and BPM tools.:thumbup:
     
    Last edited: Jun 25, 2008
  3. w00tsTyLeZ

    w00tsTyLeZ Member

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    good thing i've been streamlining my flow chart creation abilities. celebrity programming here I come.
     
  4. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    yes, the computers will be the technical architects. we will not be able to know how they do it. It will just work.
     
  5. Semi-Evolved

    Semi-Evolved Member

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    In ten years? You're dreaming, mate.
     
  6. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    no im not dreaming but its an estimate. Most of the pieces are in place. pattern recognition is the show stopper. it will take less than 10 years to have the breakthrough, the rest will follow like a tidalwave!
     
  7. teegman

    teegman Member

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    then 3 years later they'll become self aware and we'll be hiding from the rock star self-programmers

    \m/
     
  8. Bion1c

    Bion1c Member

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    AND WE'LL ALL BE FLYING AROUND IN OUR ROCKET CARS!! :thumbup:
     
  9. houseofzeus

    houseofzeus Member

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    I'm pretty sure at least one poster here signed up for an IT related degree on the basis of watching Swordfish.
     
  10. w00tsTyLeZ

    w00tsTyLeZ Member

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    but the multi monitor, 3d graphical coding interface never came, it never came !!
     
  11. Silenius

    Silenius Member

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    Actually that might be my thesis. Advanced code visualisation... at the same time as LOOKING COOL, DAMNIT.

    Not to give away too many secrets though. When I release my editor... well, everyone wanted the 3D desktop cube in Linux, right? Tip o'th'iceberg :)

    Yeah, I'm one of those dudes who enjoys spending hours getting the text editor's colours just so... :|

    :)
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  12. deepspring

    deepspring Member

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    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  13. Bion1c

    Bion1c Member

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    i'm sure it totally will since the only possible use for Java is to run animations in a browser :rolleyes:

    hint: JavaFX competes in that product space
     
  14. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    And on that day, Skynet became self aware...
     
  15. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    I actually do know of specific academics (and businesses even) attempting to develop software development tools that are based on business logic. In fact, it's anything but a new area, especially when it comes to the academic world.

    (Un?)fortunately they seem to have achieved sfa thus far :)
     
  16. Bion1c

    Bion1c Member

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    Yer same.. when i was at uni i remember there were lecturers doing research in the same area.

    I gotta say though most of them were so far out of reality it was a joke. One lecturer i was working for as a lab assistant had convinced himself that he was going to revolutionize software development because he had some this wacky notation for specifying use cases. In theory it wasn't a bad concept, the use cases were written in a deterministic formalised notation, with the idea that they could be used to generate software.

    You know it kindve sounded familiar though, maybe you could call the process of generating executable code "compilation"? :lol:

    Needless to say you've never heard of this guys ideas, but i'm sure he continues to promote himself as a "visionary" (or possibly "rock star programmer") within his ivory tower.

    I should probably add that i'm not a *total* cynic about this kind of stuff. I think using BPM tools to generate software does have some legitimate uses, such as in system integration. I haven't done much work in that area, but from what i've seen it was a lot easier to visualise messages passing around a bunch of systems rather than trying to decipher code. However without good planning, in a large system this can quickly turn into spaggetti. So (as usual) a critical success factor is that the architects/tech leads know what they're doing.. you can't just rely on sexy tools and hope it works out
     
    Last edited: Jun 26, 2008
  17. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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  18. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    The first paradigm shift occurs when one realises that humans are no more than machines. Our mind is what our brain does. There are abundant examples of computers replacing the things that were once thought only humans can do, like playing chess for example.

    Evolution and Natural selection gave us the second paradigm shift. That intelligent systems can grow from unintelligent processes. This allows us to take simple computers, throw them into an environment, and with enough time they will grow into something awesome (just like how humans grew from amoema).
     
  19. phreeky82

    phreeky82 Member

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    Bio-computing is the path that is practically needed to accomplish such learning systems, and the scale of such a bio-system is possibly going to be that of the human mind anyway. Are we essentially going to be growing what is the human mind (ok, not exactly, but you get the idea).

    If you consider a human as a form of computer, then a human being is a perfectly good tool to use ;)
     
  20. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    yeah hehe some differences tho, human brains are fixed in speed and capacity for the next million years or so, computer brains are upgradable.
     

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