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Why I use Linux.

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by Vulkanyaz, Nov 7, 2008.

  1. Vulkanyaz

    Vulkanyaz Member

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    This is a thread for people to give a reason or two as to why they use (GNU/)Linux. Not any particular distro.

    I use it on every single one of my machines. And the primary reason I do is that if I want to do something, or more specifically fix something, I can. If something goes awry it's usually me who did it.

    And when you're looking for a solution, the documentation written is incredible. Most of it by the community. Wikis, Forums, IRC. Man pages. User-maintained repositories, etc. People can contribute in so many ways.

    I love how everything is so open (source). You can do pretty much whatever you want to your system and everything on it.

    tl;dr: I take great satisfaction in actually being able to fix whatever I fuck up.

    Had a crash and just had to get that out there. :thumbup:
     
  2. 4wardtristan

    4wardtristan Member

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    its free and extremely flexible.
     
  3. bomber_ace

    bomber_ace Member

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    I'd have to agree with the OP. I'd also add that the ease of installing software from either apt-get or synaptic (as that is what my distro uses) makes it far less of a hassle. The speed at which improvements to all facets of the system are being released is very impressive.

    Even though I still consider myself a noob after using it constantly for the past two years, the amount that I have been able to do (and learn) because of the openness of the system is very satisfying. The control that one can have over the system is also very pleasing.

    Whilst I am still able to breathe, I will tell everyone who cares to listen, about the benefits of using GNU/Linux. If they try it and like it, that's great. If not, then that is their loss as far as I'm concerned.
     
  4. IncredibleBulk

    IncredibleBulk Member

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    Simple...

    It's not Windows :p

    But seriously, I started using it mainly because I was "bored" and kept hearing other people talking about it. I've learnt alot from the many struggles that have occasionally popped up.
     
  5. SteakTheMooCow

    SteakTheMooCow (Taking a Break)

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    Anyone who has met me (specifically LCA 07) knows why I do.

    For those who don't, well, I compile.
     
  6. foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    5 reasons:

    1. Modular
    2. Secure
    3. Powerful
    4. Choice
    5. I find I can do more in Linux than Windows anway.
     
  7. pipsqeek

    pipsqeek Member

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    As an IT techie I can install, administer and have a linux box up and running in about 30 minutes.

    Linux utilises system resources better.

    It's free - as in freedom to do whatever the hell I want with it.

    I can duplicate it legally and distribute it to friends.

    Designed with the user in mind, not money in mind.

    There's a whole to more but I have to run to the toilet :)
     
  8. TMM

    TMM Member

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    Secure, and Free (in both senses)
     
  9. NiSlo

    NiSlo Member

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    Hehe, I've just jumped on here while Ubuntu is burning onto cd to install it in a few minutes. I went looking for linux software to write iso's (as I use them alot), but it turns out iso support is built in! What a world we live in. :lol:

    I'll report back in a few days with why I use Linux :thumbup:
     
  10. foxmulder881

    foxmulder881 Member

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    Oh don't you hate that. When you're sitting on the crapper thinking about linux!
     
  11. nexx

    nexx Member

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    It all comes down to the quality of the software for me. Even in Windows I use a large range of open source software (and a few proprietary products) because they do a better job for what I want and my level of experience.

    I like software that is highly configurable, supports open & standardised formats, and focuses on doing one thing (or a few things) and doing it right.

    I largely use Linux because I tried it out 2 months ago and found it can do nearly everything I want. With the exception of Photoshop, Visual Studio & a bunch of games...I would run it exclusively.
     
  12. xsive

    xsive Member

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    I much prefer OSX to Linux actually but the latter is quite bearable. I think for me the most important thing is an OS that makes the gnu toolchain available. Once I have that, I'm happily compiling away :)
     
  13. coffeemonster

    coffeemonster Member

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    it lets me do what i want, it doesn't control me me all the time unlike windows
    espec in vista there are things it just doesn't let you do and there is nothing you can do about it
     
  14. stmok

    stmok Member

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    (1) It doesn't have nonsensical anti-piracy measures. (No nag screens or dialing home to verify that my copy is legit on a regular basis.)

    (2) I don't waste time trying to figure out "What's the best AV, Firewall, etc?" (or some other BS anti-malware that supposedly makes you feel safe...When it really doesn't)

    (3) I am responsible for MY system. I get into trouble, I dig my way back out of it, and I learn from it.

    (4) I learn something new every day. Whether it be through self-discovery, through the community, or through experience.

    (5) I only pay for hardware. Period.

    (6) It isn't patronising or assumes something I want. It lets me do what I need, and stays out of my way.

    (7) I don't get crucified for sharing as many copies or installing as many times as I want. Whether it be under physical or virtual machine.

    (8) There's no marketing spin and constant lies. There's just the code and the community.

    (9) I upgrade hardware when I want to. Not when someone else says so, because they need to meet annual profit goals.

    (10) A greater sense of community. Responsibility of improvement is entirely up to us.

    (11) The freedom to choose how I want my system to be.

    (12) No longer need to pirate software. I have everything I need. Legal and free.
     
  15. elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    A poster on Slashdot recently summed up in two simple sentences what I've been saying in rants for years:

    "I don't want a system that's user friendly. I want a system that's user obedient".

    That is to say, I want a system that does (or doesn't do) things the way *I* tell it, not the way some foreign programmer imposes on me. The "four freedoms" that RMS spells out in his "copyleft" document give me the "user obedience" I require.

    I also firmly believe that non-free software is holding the world back. Big proprietary vendors will tell you that "proprietary software breeds competition, and competition breeds improvement". I disagree. Thus far the last 25 years of IT has shown us that proprietary software breeds underhanded business tactics, artificial competition restrictions, and sub-standard software that is released at delayed time frames in order to maximise profits over and above the benefits to end users (both in security and functionality).

    I do not see a need to constantly re-invent the wheel. Proprietary software forces just that: everyone needs to start from scratch in order to make a decent product (particularly so with large products, say like Office software). Free software removes this restriction: it allows forks of code, and micro-improvements. It's organic in it's ability to grow to suit the immediate needs of users, rather than the financial needs of the seller. And it also ensures that in order to make a profit from it, there needs to be "value add" from the vendor (usually in the form of support). I've spent many years in the corporate IT world, and I can tell you now the proprietary vendors are *THE WORST* at support. It's utterly non-essential for them to support you unless your multi-year-contract is up for renewal, at which time you'll get butt-kissed for a few months, and then left out to dry after you sign on the dotted line.

    Compare and contrast to free software, where I can seek support from anyone I choose. And I can be much more demanding with my support requirements when there's an open and free market of equal opportunity for people to support my software and systems.

    Going back to my original point: flexibility is inversely proportional to "ease of use". The same old argument is presented to me time and time again as to why people should not use Linux: because "it's too difficult". Quite honestly, that doesn't bother me. In fact, I like difficult things. I play difficult games, attempt difficult mind puzzles, and study difficult philosophy. I find all of them far more rewarding on completion than their trivial counterparts. Being "difficult" is not a "con" to me.

    Particularly when talked about in relation to business, I hear that "Linux is not ready" because "it's too difficult". Again, after doing hard time for the corporate IT world, I've yet to find a business that let a user manage anything on the system. Competent IT staff are hired to manage these things, which to me negates the "it's too hard" argument. Here's a rant I prepared earlier on the topic.

    I could go on for days about it all, but the summary would always be the same, single word: "freedom".
     
  16. xsive

    xsive Member

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    Yet Linux and its GPL licensing limits your freedom. We've had this discussion before so I don't want to open that can of worms again. Just thought I'd remind you the only operating systems that give total freedom all end in BSD ;)
     
  17. -=N0N@ME420=-

    -=N0N@ME420=- Member

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    I use linux because I was tired of windows fucking up on me all the time for no reason at all.
     
  18. SteakTheMooCow

    SteakTheMooCow (Taking a Break)

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    I tend to find it has a reason. In a close environment there is usually one common source of errors.

    I have come more and more to terms with that as the errors still tend to occur on Linux for the self same users (read: me).

    The freedom to know what I've broken is nice though.
     
  19. r3flexion

    r3flexion Member

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    I use linux because it's great on old hardware for servers. Also, if I need to format, I can get it running much quicker because everything is so automagic these days.

    I don't use linux because I need Photoshop, Word, Visual Studio... :p
    I wish I could though.
     
    Last edited: Nov 9, 2008
  20. -=N0N@ME420=-

    -=N0N@ME420=- Member

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    For me there was no common reason. There was nothing I could find that would say 'because of this, XP will now run slower' even though task manager showed nothing major happening in regards to hard disk usage, cpu usage, ram usage.

    I have to keep my xp system virtually bare of any program installs less it becomes slower and slower.

    common source: xp.
     

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