Wifi Mesh - New home build

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by ~kraven, Apr 15, 2019.

  1. ~kraven

    ~kraven Member

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    Hi,

    In the process of building a new home. It'll be a single story but spans over a large area (340sqm).

    I'm getting CAT6 points installed throughout the home but want to have great WiFi coverage as well. I planned on putting 2 POE points in the ceiling to get coverage over the home by adding POE wifi points.

    What I don't know is:
    • Connecting to an Asus AC68U Router - Do I leave this to do all the work/DHCP?
    • Two wifi (mesh?) points that'll either attach to the ceiling or can hide in the ceiling? That use POE.
    • Is this a better way of ensuring coverage? Plan to make all the CAT6 points do the main work (4k streaming etc) and WiFi is more for browsing/mobile devices.
    • If they have to go on the ceiling, suggestions on good and also mostly invisible ones to look at? (no flashy lights etc)
    Thanks
     
  2. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    We have a 286m2 house, single story and a single Unifi AP covers it fine. I might add a 2nd one later if the kids need it however even with 2 TV's streaming netflix on HD we have never had issues.
     
  3. Quadbox

    Quadbox Member

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    Yes you'd leave your router to do all the work. Unifis'd do the job fine, regarding the flashing light thing you can disable the status LEDs in the configuration page.
     
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  4. Jazper

    Jazper Member

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    With networking, I've become lazy in my older age - I have a google wifi setup. It updates itself, has 3 pucks which can be linked by ethernet, or create their own wireless links, and works as a router as well. It is a solution that "Just works" and offers a fair bit of coverage.

    I have a switch connected at one end for all of my wireless stuff

    If you're having cat6 installed - then having one puck at one end, one in the center, and one at the other end all linked with the cables will definitely give you the coverage you need
     
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  5. Tinian

    Tinian Member

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    Having had a look at that, I think that will be a perfect solution for my apartment. :thumbup: I'll run a small managed PoE switch for it and the cabled runs into the rooms for my workstation, TV and servers.
     
  6. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    That's what I did and found the only thing I needed a data port was for my PC and TV's. Apple TV is wireless and the Unifi handles 2 of those over wifi perfectly.
     
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  7. Copie

    Copie Member

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    Wherever you are planning to put in a cat 6 point, double it up. Especially in areas where you will have more then one device or something like a tv. You can then run HDMI over cat 6 etc etc easier.

    Better solution is to have 6-8 points in the major spots (office desk/entertainment unit) and minimum 2 points where you plan to put a tv (either wall mount or bench mount) + in places like behind the couch etc. I would also put a number of unterminated runs into the roofspace with ample cable, that way if you want to get cameras later on its only a matter of taking the cable to where you want the camera to be, punching through the gyprock and plugging it all in.
     
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  8. money_killer

    money_killer Member

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    ideally to maximise coverage you need a bit of height(domestic house ceiling are too low) in the roof space up high is best

    and as above you can never have to many points nows the time to plan it properly and do it once and do it right.

    we run a min of to
    bedrooms 2xcat6 and 3xrg6
    main rooms 4xcat6 and 3xrg6
     
    Last edited: Apr 19, 2019
  9. koopz

    koopz Member

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    mesh is great until you need low latency ( video and VOIP )

    it's expensive to replace later when you find that you can't replace one repeater.

    To put this in perspective, how easy is it to replace a sat uniden handset today?

    Do your research and run the numbers.

    Choose what works for you.
     
  10. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    It's domestic and last time I checked very seldom was low latency required for a domestic wifi network\mesh
     
  11. sTeeLzor

    sTeeLzor Member

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    Agreed. Its over-engineering at its finest and tech heads/enthusiasts are some of the worst for it.

    I run plenty of full size 1080P videos over WiFi. Works perfectly fine throughout my entire house. I'd still hard-wire by choice but its not as necessary as it used to be. Same opinion running 6 hardwired points to a lounge room. Do you really need your AVR/Game Consoles/Media Player/TV all connected at the same time? Nah. Consoles latency is fine over in home wifi for games. The only use cases most people need hardwired is for File Transfers, Media Serving, and 4K media playing. Even then, it has to be local 4K files because 4K Netflix works fine over 2.4GHz anyway.

    I just built my 2 storey house. 2 Hard-Wired to the Theatre/Master Bedroom/Lounge Room/Kids Activity/Study. Study upstairs will have a Meshed WiFi Asus Router, Downstairs will have an Meshed WiFi Router and these will be hardwired to the backbone. Ill Media Serve out of the Garage where all the points terminate back to. And that will leave a few ports for the main tvs. Even then its likely to be direct to a console rather than TV because I dont use media through my TV. Only through a console.
     
  12. Symon

    Symon Castigat ridendo mores

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    Cat6 is cheap, and it's a lot cheaper to put in now than later. When I had termite damage in my house I took the opportunity to run Cat 6A everywhere while the walls were being replaced.

    Sure there is an element of over-engineering, but if you are intending to stay in your house for a while you'll kick yourself later for not doing it now.
     
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  13. sTeeLzor

    sTeeLzor Member

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    Or your points will sit unused/connected to unused networked equipment :D

    I definitely agree with putting in a few points across the main areas, serving media/tv/consoles. Save yourself the effort if you want to through out 30 runs though... I would use media consumers as hard wired. Most other stuff can stay wireless
     
  14. OP
    OP
    ~kraven

    ~kraven Member

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    Thanks for all the replies.

    Wiring up main areas with some double points (Main Living and Theatre)

    The rest will get one point for major use (streaming 4k media). Browsing, general use etc will all be served with wireless.

    Grabbed a set of three TP-Link mesh units on sale and will see how they go. Fitting to ceiling throughout home with POE and aren't much bigger than a smoke alarm.
     
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  15. s4mmy

    s4mmy Member

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    Main theatre room id do more than two. At least 4.
    You always end up using them.

    My main TV I have.
    TV
    Apple TV
    Foxtel iQ3 (gone now)
    NUC
    Sonos play bar (has pass through)

    Then if you have any consoles etc... it just grows!
     
  16. sTeeLzor

    sTeeLzor Member

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    This is where people start getting silly. Connecting your TV (who uses their inbuilt TV software when they have hardware options available), Sound Bar (why?), and 3 Media Consumption devices all at once is just to say it is. Im going to guess only 2 of those ports are every really used.

    2 in the main areas is fine. I connect my Xbox which does all my media. I do not connect my TV because why? I do not connect my AVR because why? I do not need 4 different consumption devices because my Xbox does everything. I put in 2 points at each section for redundancy in case of failure and in case I want an Access Point or other random piece of equipment connected.
     
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  17. Zee

    Zee Member

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    Sonos is a networked streaming music system - kinda needs internet to work.

    My general rule - if it stays in one spot, hard wire it. If it moves around, it uses wifi. Cat6 is cheap, and if you're already doing a run, pulling another 2 or 3 through at the same time is easy. You can always put a switch in there, of course.

    As for TV and AVR... Your thinking is too limited. I've been integrating TV's, receivers, BD players etc for decades, and for the last 10 years, IP control has been an option. This will work for the NUC (assuming you're running Kodi), most models of Samsung, Sony and LG TV, most reasonable surround receivers - and you don't want any of them controlled over wifi - wifi has a habit of being flaky exactly when you need it not to be.

    And in this day and age of Google Now and Elexa, where people want to voice control everything, you want those devices hard wired to avoid frustration. Because, the difference between "this works awesome", and "this sucks", is one command not working properly once every few weeks.

    Z...
     
  18. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    Not when doing a new build it isn't, trust me. My builder charged $120 PER PORT, not run - PORT. Want a quad port? $480 thank you.

    Couldn't get our own contractor in as the builder(who technically owns the site) wouldn't allow them onsite during the build so it was either pay up or get it done after and as we were having insulation put in to all the internal walls it would have made it a difficult job. So we were forced to pay but I did reduce the number i wanted.
     
  19. Zee

    Zee Member

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    You're being ripped... Just get them to run the cable.

    Find yourself someone to terminate afterwards. It's about $130 for a 305m box of Cat6, and about $5/socket, plus the plate. This is form the likes of J.R. Turks, TLE etc.

    Z...
     
  20. Gunna

    Gunna Member

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    I know the price, i've had many data points quoted as part of my job. The denied the request to run the cables, they said we could either get them to run and terminate or get it installed after completion. As a builder they know they have you by the short and curly's
     

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