Wildlife with the Sony 100-400GM

Discussion in 'The Gallery' started by Digit, Oct 30, 2018.

  1. Digit

    Digit Member

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    Hey All,

    So i recently picked up the Sony 100-400GM and have been having a play around photographing some wildlife after work. Always happy to receive constructive feedback and handy tips/tricks. I need to work on getting closer to the animals I think.

    An unashamed link to my instagram (to which I've only just really started posting to).
    www.instagram.com/martin.juleff

    1. Sacred Kingfisher. Sony a7ii, 400mm, f5.6, 1/640, ISO 400, very heavy crop!
    _DSC0003.jpg

    2. Rainbow Bee Eater. Sony a7ii, 400mm, f5.6, 1/2500, ISO 800, very heavy crop (again)!

    _DSC0059.jpg

    3. Dragonfly. Sony a7ii, 400mm, f5.6, 1/500, ISO 400.

    _DSC9981.jpg

    4. Eastern Water Dragon (rusty coloured). Sony a7ii, 400mm, f5.6, 1/640, ISO 800.

    _DSC9961-3.jpg

    5. Pair of Fairy Wrens (female and male). Sony a7ii, 400mm, f5.6, 1/1250, ISO 6400 (dammit, should've gone 3200 or 2500). This was taken on my very first trip out with this lens, and I was so stoked to make a male and female fairy wren land on my mates car and pose for me.

    _DSC9927.jpg
     
    Last edited: Oct 30, 2018
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  2. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    nice little set, the noise is pretty apparent but thats unavoidable unless filling the frame.
    Just shot the RBE's myself in their usual nesting haunts in Perth for breeding
     
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  3. OP
    OP
    Digit

    Digit Member

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    Thanks, I need to work on getting closer (got any tips? Buy a ladder lol?), the fairy wrens were pretty close but it was getting dark and 6400 iso produces a bit of noise on the a7ii.

    Would love to see your RBE shots!
     
  4. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    Birds are creatures of habit so usually return back to their original perches at some stage - but depends on the species.
    Their tolerance for your distance depends a bit on location and species etc - the RBE's here are usually so focused on feeding you can get really close.

    I'd also try to drop shutter speed once you've got some "keepers" you'd be surprised how slow you can shoot a perched bird (especially with OSS) - you'll get lots with blur but the odd good one at the lower ISO range.

    I'll probably do a full post myself but this was me testing out the A6000 with the Sigma 500mm sport (Manual focus only as Nikon mount)
    [​IMG]
     
  5. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    I think the Water dragon is your best :thumbup:
     
  6. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Yes, the water dragon is fabulous, he looks like he's posing for you. I like the fairy wrens too.
     
  7. Bold Eagle

    Bold Eagle Member

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    Some awesome shots - the last one is a Superb Fairy Wren (if your interested) and the top one I am more sure of it being a Forest King Fisher as the Sacred will have a more blue-green (if we saw the side of the wing and if a white patch was noted) you'd know for sure.

    The dragonfly (damselflies) is called a 'Common Bluetail';
    http://www.brisbaneinsects.com/brisbane_dragons/BlueTail.htm
     
    Last edited: Oct 31, 2018
  8. OP
    OP
    Digit

    Digit Member

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    Thanks for the tips man, I definitely have noticed the RBE's and kingfishers return to the same branches. I'm trying to find exactly where the nests are and which branches they frequent, I saw a pair of Kingfishers checking various hollows. What time do you find best for wildlife? I've heard strong light is alright because it gives more detail or do you find softer morning/afternoon light more appealing (I suppose the lower angle illuminates them from the side not above).

    I can't wait to see your post, I do love the lineup of Nikon lenses for Wildlife, hopefully Sony releases more.

    Thanks guys, is it the sharpness/technical aspects you like or composition and interest?
     
  9. lonewolf1983

    lonewolf1983 Member

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    Personally early morning and late afternoon works best, provided the subject is lit (birds are tricky due to being in shade a lot) and you have a clear background.
    Overcast days means you can shoot during more of the day though - and dont rule out a nicely sidelit or backlit image, can make for nice silhouette
     
  10. OP
    OP
    Digit

    Digit Member

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    Appreciate the help with ID, I had no idea about the blue-tail. I'm pretty sure it is the sacred, I think the calls are distinctively different and it doesn't have the white dot on the face you'd get with the Forest.
     
  11. OP
    OP
    Digit

    Digit Member

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    Thanks for that mate, I've definitely noticed when you shoot in the middle of the day, the sky is wayyy too bright even when the bird is lit.
     
  12. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    All of the above, colours, sharpness/clarity, focus aspects and composition. Just an all around good shot.
     
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  13. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    For me, it's usually this, because I don't necessarily notice technical aspects.
     
  14. OP
    OP
    Digit

    Digit Member

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    I have some more wildlife shots I thought I'd share, as always feedback is welcome (how else will I get better!?)

    1. A Crested Shriketit catching a bug under the bark of a Eucalyptus tereticornis. Unfortunately I just missed focus, which hit the bark slightly in front of it. I have another where it hit him perfectly, but his crest was down. Any tips on nailing focus reliably and quickly?
    [​IMG]Crested Shrike Tit by Martin Juleff, on Flickr

    2. A female spotted pardalote.
    [​IMG]Spotted Pardalote by Martin Juleff, on Flickr

    3. Male Spotted pardalote. I think the background was a bit too busy and distracts from the bird.
    [​IMG]Spotted Pardalote by Martin Juleff, on Flickr

    4. Lace Monitor.
    [​IMG]Lace Monitor by Martin Juleff, on Flickr

    5. Another big Lacie.
    [​IMG]Lace Monitor by Martin Juleff, on Flickr
     
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  15. Pbx_Jnr

    Pbx_Jnr Member

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    Some lovely detailed shots there Digit ! I also am liking the variety of compositions you have got there too.

    My only suggestion would be to try and get some light on the eyes you are focusing on. The catchlight like in #2 is a small thing, but makes a big difference :)

    All of the others would be much better if you could see the eyes a bit more.
     
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  16. OP
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    Digit

    Digit Member

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    Thanks for that Pbx, the eye of the female SP really does catch your eye! If i recall, I had the sun behind me, so I'll try and position myself between the animal and the sun next time to see if that helps.
     

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