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[WIN10] windows is a pos

Discussion in 'Windows Operating Systems' started by everybodies, Mar 16, 2019.

  1. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    I saw folks do this with XP. Most got heavily malwared. Yeah, even the "half a clue" ones. Only a matter of time.

    OCAU: where we give shit to Mac users for being "sheep" / bad at computers, but then can't/won't learn new computer things ourselves.

    Next time you see an old person complaining about how hard computers are, remember that could be you soon. Keep learning new things. It's good for you.

    I've converted whole businesses to Linux desktops in under 6 months. That includes training hundreds of artists (not technical people at all).

    You can do it. It doesn't take years.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
    GoneFishin22 likes this.
  2. Myne_h

    Myne_h Member

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    I ran NT4 connected wide open to the net (bridged) in ~2001. Got an xp virus that wouldn't run. Deleted it eventually.

    It's almost as if there's more than 2 people on OCAU.

    Don't have time for. I want shit to work out of the box so I can get on with whatever I want to do. Which Linux tends not to - and there's surprisingly sparse help on google for some things.
     
  3. Perko

    Perko Member

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    It's a symbiotic relationship of sorts. Mac and Windows users are largely technically illiterate, highlighted by the number of Mac people who have endless issues whenever they touch Windows, and the number of Windows users who think that Macs are stupid and hard to use, (ie it's not their native UI). So you end up with stupid threads by the dozen.

    I don't understand the difficulty with switching between OS' at will in general, especially for people who use this forum, surely it's basic IT on a tech forum.
     
  4. power

    power Member

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    nope, older versions of Office are open to threat vectors just like any out of date software.
     
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  5. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    This is the third thread to my knowledge (with one of the other two being quite lengthy) filled to the brim with people struggling to make the migration from Win7 to Win10. For all of Windows' proclaimed "it's intuitive", it's clearly not when people can't even jump across products from the same vendor.

    And of course, let us not forget only a few short years ago the same level of angst switching from XP to 7.

    I'm with you - I sit in four different families of operating systems all day long, and about 2-3 major versions of each. Switching back and forth is not a big deal, and yet a big part of my job is teaching people who spend MORE TIME using a single OS than I do how to use that OS.

    As a general life tip, whenever you feel the urge to start a sentence with the word "Surely...", you can be rest assured it isn't.
     
    Perko likes this.
  6. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    Meh, I don't tend to have any issues with (not withstanding what I've said in the next sentence), your mileage obviously varies.

    But in terms of Sleep yes I an issue with it years ago, found it flaky for me, now I just never use it.
     
  7. BAK

    BAK Member

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    I fixed that for you.
     
    elvis likes this.
  8. metamorphosis

    metamorphosis Member

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    Pffft. Modernists these days... I still use Office '97.
     
    FIREWIRE1394 likes this.
  9. Myne_h

    Myne_h Member

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    It's not that it's hard to make the jump. The guts are similar. But the UI just different enough to be really irritating.
    It's just almost like swapping all the controls around in a car. Ever jumped in a Euro and put the wipers on trying to indicate? Bam. That's windows 10 to me and probably many of us.
    Frankly, it looks like half the windows users in the world feel/felt that way given the FREE upgrade and slow adoption rates.

    I don't recall much angst switching to 7. Vista yes, 8 yes, 7 no.

    Well yes, it's your job. I'm really good at using the systems related to my work - even though half of them are stupid.

    Surely you're smart enough to know that ;p
     
  10. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Ah yes, car analogies. I've seen millions of dollars blown on IT projects because people used car analogies, and the analogies failed.

    There were dozens of threads filled with hate here on OCAU. Millions more out in the real world. The reason you don't remember is that the folks who hated it were all a bit older than you. They'd all reached that point in their life where it was "too hard" to learn new things, and they just wanted everything to stay the same.

    You didn't have problems back then because you were a bit younger, your mind a bit more elastic. Now, you're getting a bit older, things are a bit more annoying, and you're turning into that old guy you get used to get frustrated at because he hates new fangled things.

    It's the circle of life.

    My Linux knowledge was self taught, before I got a job (I used that knowledge to get the job). Before the Internet was even a big thing, filled to the brim with forums and YouTube videos and online resources and training tools. Before Linux was fall-off-a-log easy to use, with live images that can run off USB, with fully automated GUI installers, with one-click driver and package downloads.

    Today, Linux is easier than ever. It's all the automatic, easy-to-use things above. I've taught it to old ladies, I've taught it to the unemployed, I've taught it to children, I've taught it to warehouse forklift drivers, I've taught it to motorcycle mechanics, I've taught it to tape operators, I've taught it to CEOs, I've taught it to die-hard Windows users, I've taught it to the most hand-wavey toked-off-their-gourds hippy artists.

    If you don't want to learn either Linux or Windows 10, that's fine. I accept that choice. But you can, if you want to. Alternatively, you can turn into that old guy who hates new things. That's cool too. But don't give me your sloppy car analogies as a reason why you can't. Own your decision, and live with sticking with an OS that will ultimately be abandoned by the people you paid money to.

    bane_win7.jpg

    * Image composed in Linux
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
  11. Myne_h

    Myne_h Member

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    Does the analogy not work?
    I would have thought it was pretty simple. It's a common mistake/irritation due to a UI change.

    Congratulations on being a great teacher. I've walked a 95yo through setting up a satellite connection over the phone. Who gives a shit? What's the point there? Me dumdum coz granny can browse and email on ubuntu?

    Tool doesn't do what I want, work in a manner I expect, or requires more time than I have available: I use tool that fits those requirements.
    I'm not anti-Linux. I use it for things like the XFCE-Buntu pihole I mentioned - because it actually worked (albeit with much more time invested than I wanted) and it does the job.
     
  12. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I'd love to know how. I ran windows 98 and then xp for years. I had a virus scanner and I've never, ever, ever, had any virus scanner detect any malware. Nothing. nada. Not only never had a computer virus, never had one detected.
    I looked it up once, the incidence of malware. US, prevalent, China, prevalent, Australia, not so much. No doubt things have changed, now that they don't need "viruses" as much.
     
  13. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/CryptoLocker

    Cryptolocker was the original. There are new clones and variants coming out literally by the week. To date, successful infections are in the hundreds of millions of PCs (putting it at about 10% of the world's computer population, and growing).

    Maersk is the world's largest shipping organisation. One in eight containers sitting in docks and on trains worldwide right now belong to Maersk. They got hit hard, and it cost them tens of billions in damage:
    https://www.wired.com/story/notpetya-cyberattack-ukraine-russia-code-crashed-the-world/

    Big or small business, cryptolocker is the single biggest digital risk to business operations today.

    The Australian Cyber Securities Centre, backed by the Australian Signals Directorate, release some very long winded material on how to secure your computers. Thankfully, they also release a short version of the "essential 8" things you should do:
    https://acsc.gov.au/publications/protect/essential-eight-explained.htm

    Part of that essential 8 is "PATCH YOUR SHIT". If you can't patch it, get rid of it and find something that can be patched.

    In your sample of 1 user, you didn't get hit by malware. And that's great for you - you took the risk and survived. That doesn't mean there was no risk. That means you were lucky. But jump in the enterprise rant thread, and you'll see at least one person reporting a customer site per month getting wiped out, and the story is always the same - out of date shit, business not patching their crap, etc, etc. When WinXP went EOL, there was a spate of that nonsense. Add in recent EternalBlue type vulnerabilities and other SMB1 issues not patched in Windows XP, and you've got highly vulnerable systems to the "Swiss army knife" multi-vector attack patterns that modern malware uses. Once Win7 goes EOL, the same is going to happen all over again.

    But, if you're the type who loves a gamble, put your life savings on black down at the local casino roulette table, and keep running Win7 while past Jan 14, 2020. Best of luck to you.
     
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  14. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Don't you have to click on something to get cryptolocker?
    Who cares anyway? All data is backed up, if it gets encrypted, you nuke the system and restore the backup.

    Part 1. If it's important shit, don't expose it to ratbags by connecting it to the internet.
     
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  15. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    People have been embedding shit in images, advertising, flash, shockwave, fonts, etc for *years* that is then run as privileges upto and including system/ring0. Rowhammer/Spectre/Meltdown's big piece is that you don't even need to be running in the same virtual machine/memory space to steal your datas.

    PATCH YOUR SHIT
     
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  16. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    So crypotolocker just suddenly happens without opening anything or clicking on anything. Gotcha.
     
  17. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Cryptolocker is a result - its not a attack vector.

    That is to say - how i get into your system to run my code is completely separate and unique to what i run on your system. I've seen Cryptolocker-like stuff through about 6-7 different vectors at this point - including everything but fonts.

    They can run it via a browser... If the browser can escape its process and access your filesystem. This is why browsers are often targeted in hackathons.
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
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  18. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    Modern malware is "multi-vector". So yes, you can get infected by doing literally nothing, and the attack can be initiated by a remote third party. You can be attacked a whole bunch of different ways too. That's the "multi" in "multi-vector".

    You can also turn the PC off, fill it with concrete, and throw it in the river. But (a) that's not really useful, and (b) nobody's talking about that in this thread. People are talking about using unpatched, unsupported software past it's EOL date because they don't want to learn new things.

    I can 100% guarantee you these folks are wanting to connect these machines to the Internet, because they're talking to us in this forum right now from those machines (which will be unsupported and unpatched in roughly 300 days). And the advice of very highly paid professionals in this thread is always the same: don't do that. Use supported, patched software, and always...
     
    Last edited: Mar 19, 2019
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  19. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Really? Not connect them to a machine that is connected to the internet?
    So, remote third parties are just sitting there trying to "attack" some random user, somewhere.
     
  20. NSanity

    NSanity Member

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    Give an XP machine a public ip with default firewall rules...

    Let me know if you get to 10 minutes without being hit. (you won't).
     

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