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Windows market share drops below 90%

Discussion in 'Windows Operating Systems' started by elvis, Dec 3, 2008.

  1. elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    http://www.computerworld.com/action/article.do?command=viewArticleBasic&articleId=9121938

    Before an inflammatory comments begin, the article indicates the "drop" in Windows marketshare is not due to existing users switching away from Windows, but rather a boom of new home computer users appearing and taking up Apple hardware (as opposed to corporate users, who are predominantly Windows based).

    It also notes that Vista market share has now risen above 20%.

    Insert the usual caveat emptor about "lies and statistics" of course.

     
  2. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    In related news, Apples market share grows, and Apple recommends getting Anti Virus software for an ever growing trend of attacks against OSX.

    http://www.theregister.co.uk/2008/12/02/apple_mac_av_advice/

     
  3. [KEi]SoVeReIgN

    [KEi]SoVeReIgN Member

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    Makes sense doesn't it - Apple (And OS X) market share goes up, Microsoft goes down.

    And it will probably continue this way, especially now OS X integration into windows corporate environments is basically seemless.


     
    Last edited: Dec 3, 2008
  4. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    Last edited by a moderator: Dec 8, 2008
  5. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    The pedant in me thinks all "Anti Virus" vendors should stop calling their software "Anti Virus" and start calling it something else, given that the "virus" of old is pretty much dead on all operating systems. But I've been told I'm just arguing semantics...

    As for Apple: I'm very disappointed in their current patching rate. The fact that they're suggesting third party software to fix the gaps in their lagging patch delivery is very slack. With that said, they've utterly pissed off the BSD communities, so they've seen a massive drop in patches submitted upstream in the last few years.

    Given the wads of cash they are making these days, hiring a few extra security guys and speeding up their vulnerability testing/detection/patching would probably be a good thing, before it gets out of control and their "more secure than Windows" rumour/reputation slides backwards any further.
     
  6. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    <offtopic>

    [​IMG]

    </offtopic>
     
  7. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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    I think there should be a bigger uptake of Linux, because OSX is a pile of shit.

    I wonder what mac is gonna do for its mac ads in regards to Virus's now.

    *hi im a mac*
    *and im a pc*

    *geez mac you dont look too good atm*
    *hey, i dont look as bad as you, your throwing up and got the runs, i just have a slight cold*
     
  8. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    As much as I like the Linux loving, "pile of shit" is a bit harsh. OSX has great potential if Apple would be willing to either put more development dollars towards it. They have the financial power to do so, just not the current motivation, which is what needs to change (and quickly).
     
  9. Recharge

    Recharge Member

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    welcome to our new macsoft overlords

    hey, when it Rome.. :rolleyes:

    it's all going down hill for a mac zealots now :eek:
     
  10. Munki

    Munki Member

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    "Moar iFranchise plz."

    I don't think they have enough variations of iPods yet to be focusing on their OSX.
     
  11. OP
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    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    Yes, precisely. While i* is making more money than OSX, i* will get the lion's share of R&D funding.
     
  12. OP
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    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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  13. Elyzion

    Elyzion Member

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  14. stmok

    stmok Member

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    How about "The scam to provide people a false sense of security"? :)

    (1) They aren't effective against real exploits. (Especially as a part of those all-in-one security suites).

    (2) Its naturally reactive. All it takes is a few hours to modify an existing bit of malware, and AV vendors will need a new signature. (ie: They are so far behind, it isn't funny).

    (3) They often use "proof of concept" malware as a fear mechanism.

    (4) Their findings are often sensationalised with very little details revealed. (Sites like ZDNet, eWeek, etc do this often to assist in the fear mongering, as they know most people won't bother in digging deeper.)

    (5) Its the cure, NOT prevention.

    When it comes down to it, if you know what you're doing (or at least willing to learn) with computers, you don't need anti-malware applications. Its a multi-billion dollar industry that should have been rendered useless IF people start understanding and applying.

    Its been a few years now, and they have yet to dramatically improve their process in regards to handling security related bugs.

    To be honest, I'd take Linus Torvald's perspective when it comes to "security bugs". A bug is still a bug. Regardless of how you catgorise it, it still needs to be fixed, and fixed quickly. (When you have too many bugs to handle such that you need to prioritise, then it maybe time to go back and re-design from scratch, and learn from the previous version).

    The turning point for Microsoft was Win2k and pre-SP2 WinXP. They got their reputation smashed on the security front. Unfortunately, Apple hasn't learned what MS experienced. One shouldn't be complacent about security, just because it isn't Windows.

    The one thing Linux should learn from both Microsoft and Apple, is to not waste time on countering a competitor's PR. But to use it to address their weaknesses, and improve one's self. (Use a competitor's weapon to your advantage.)

    As for the original market share article? Well, market share should be considered meaningless to open source folks. Its a distraction to what really matters: To never stop doing what we've been doing.

    It makes sense for Apple and Microsoft because they have shareholders to appease, financial goals to achieve, and the need for PR ammunition. But does it really matter for open source software?
     
  15. Bogus Jimmy

    Bogus Jimmy Member

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    As OSX approaches 10%, Windows continues its steady decline (and Linux as a contender in the desktop OS market still remains a pipe dream; iPhone will catch it soon based on these stats).
     
  16. Clippit

    Clippit Member

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    OSX is at least 9000 times more usable than any flavour of Linux I have ever seen, or pressed buttons on :rolleyes:
     
  17. OP
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    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    Does your crystal ball predict lotto numbers too?

    5 years in IT is 50 years in any other industry. The next decade is going to provide a lot of shake-ups for the software world, particularly in the public sectors worldwide (look at France, Germany and China, for example).

    See you in 2018 when we look at the market share then and see what's what.
     
  18. stmok

    stmok Member

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    A pipe dream that leads to inevitability.
    (Pipe dream to you, reality to some of us who are using it in place of Windows).

    Technology is supposed to be a tool. An extension of humans. Not a trivial competition of 8yr olds screaming "My dad is better than your dad!" (as in this case of market share).

    While technological competition happens in war, the objective is much different: Its to kill your fellow human more efficiently. (In this thread's case: popularity means profit to Microsoft and Apple by domination of a market).

    Despite what you've read in sites and blogs from places like ZDNet, etc, there will never be a "Year of the Linux Desktop" or some specific point in time. The Linux Desktop will come when its ready to be accepted by a wider audience. It'll be gradual as everyone has different perspectives as to what a desktop solution should be. Like changes in Nature, you won't notice it until it comes.

    ...And when it does come, what will you comment on then? How unfair it is to both Apple and Microsoft, because the value of software suddenly became $0?

    Microsoft's greatest fear is that more people jump onto alternatives. In such a scenario, its typical that most people don't bother going back to Windows when such alternatives covers their needs. This is why they are more likely to have some sort of leeway when it comes to software piracy.
     
  19. Catweazle

    Catweazle Member

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    Sure you're reading the same article I am?

    In the article you linked Net Applications is saying that the fluctuation is most likely explained as an anomoly for that particular month, created because it was a month where a higher number of public holidays than usual occurred, and a higher incidence of people browsing from 'pooters at home occurred. That, basically, the higher incidence of Macs at home viz a viz work already existed.

    The market share stats are usage stats, not sales stats. Those figures aren't saying that all of a sudden (over the course of a month anyways) the proportion of people owning Macs rather than PCs at home jumped by 20%. What's said there is that, for that particular month, the people whoi own Macs at home spent more time browsing the web on them than they usually do.


    There most certainly has been a swing to Mac for personal use, particularly in the US, but you don't get any indication of 'trend' from just comparing one set of collected figures with the previous month's set. You gotta compare a number of suyccessive measurements for that.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    elvis

    elvis OCAU's most famous and arrogant know-it-all

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    There have been similar articles all throughout the year. February saw a massive boost in Mac ownership worldwide (Mac sales in Australia outpaced Windows sales for that month!). Similar stories appeared at end of financial year.

    Perhaps these are all key times for "home owners" to be buying/using systems (beginning of school term, end of financial year, etc), but they are all contributing to an annual average.

    And once again, I insert the same "lies, damned lies, statistics" caveat emptor here that I did back in post #1. There'll never be an accurate measurement of market share (particularly when it comes to freely distributed software in countries without internet access). But for now, these figures are still interesting, if for nothing more than to demonstrate to the software world for a SECOND time that no single player can be dominant forever (IBM showed us that in the 80's).
     

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