Windows to Linux Unable to copy, paste and write to

Discussion in 'Other Operating Systems' started by aussie7, Sep 18, 2021.

  1. aussie7

    aussie7 Member

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    Hello, I'm moving back to fedora 34 from windows 10 and have an issue that is driving me nuts :upset:

    I have 2 ssd drives, one with windows 10 and one with fedora 34 workstation installed
    I then can easily change from win to linux by swaping out the ssd drive
    (this is all in the same pc only swapping ssd drives)
    I also have a sata 2nd drive for other files

    So I put my win 10 drive in the computer to do some windows things, that I can't do in linux, now I have put the linux ssd back in the pc and as a result, I'm now unable to modify, save or rename any of the files on the 2nd sata drive

    I'm guessing I have to mount or convert something on the drive, to do with win 10 ntfs files system, but I have no idea

    the only way I know how to get around this is to backup all the files on the 2nd sata drive to another drive, then format the 2nd sata drive and copy the files back to it

    Can someone help TIA :thumbup:
     
  2. i_trin

    i_trin Member

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    Ntfs is still proprietary I reckon. Beat to avoid it unless you only using windows. Fat32 should work. You would have to transfer files off and reformat the backup drive.
     
  3. daehenoc

    daehenoc Member

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    There's a few things going on here :) To address the copy/write of NTFS from Linux, you absolutely can read and write NTFS from Linux, you will need to use mount.ntfs to mount that drive from Linux. See 'man mount.nfts' for some really helpful information :thumbup:

    Second, you can leave both SSDs in the computer, and use your Linux drive to boot your Windows drive! You don't have to keep on physically swapping the drives in and out. Booting a Windows drive from Linux means that you don't have to swap the drives every time you want to change OS, but if you're migrating from Windows to Fedora, you may not want to do this. Let us know how you go with setting up the fstab entry!
     
  4. OP
    OP
    aussie7

    aussie7 Member

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    Thank You for the info, links and help, I will have a read and let you know how I go :)
     
  5. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Also, why are you swapping SSD's instead of just having both installed together and dual-boot as required? You could have your Windows drive permanently mounted in Linux as something like /windows or /mnt/windows etc.
     
  6. flu!d

    flu!d Never perfect, always genuine

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    In Windows, go into settings and disable 'fast boot'. My guess is that Windows is going into it's fast boot hibernation on shut down, therefore when you power off and swap operating systems the drive is being held captive by Windows in an unclean state.

    Disabling fast boot should rectify this problem.
     
  7. OP
    OP
    aussie7

    aussie7 Member

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    To solve the issue, I just copied all the files, formatted the drive and copied them back

    Thanks for the reply, I'm swapping to 100% using linux and don't want to have a duel boot system. For me it's easier to just swap out drives

    Thanks for your reply, if I swap drives over again I will try your remedy :)
     
    flu!d likes this.

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