Wireless internet, worth it?

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by Darko, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. Copie

    Copie Member

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    The defined minimum of ADSL2 isnt 8mbps, its 1.5mpbs.
     
  2. OP
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    Darko

    Darko Member

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    That's ADSL1 minimum not ADSL2+

    Regardless, the sync speed I was getting was 18Mbs and wasn't getting regular drop outs or slow downs that I'm currently experiencing.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  3. Copie

    Copie Member

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    Thats for all ADSL products.
     
  4. OP
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    Darko

    Darko Member

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    That's very good, I'd be more than happy with that!
     
  5. OP
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    Darko

    Darko Member

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    So you'd be happy if your speed suddenly dropped by 3 quarters?
     
  6. Copie

    Copie Member

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    You should be bringing this up with your RSP.

    And no my speed wouldnt be dropping like that anyways because im on fiber. If the RSP was congested or had issues i would simply get another connection and move away.
     
  7. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    My connected internet was crap, it used to be about 3000 "whatevers", dropped out, sat there, blah blah blah. The ISP said it was normal and that you weren't ever really supposed to get 8000 or whatever, yada yada yada.

    My wireless is fast, it doesn't drop out (like, never), I'm not sure what the speed is, because I'm not sitting on speed test all day trying to find out why the internet is crap and nothing is happening. I think it was 6000 or 8000 something when I tested it out of curiosity. It was more like the speeds you are supposed to get on ADSL2 which I never had.

    If your interest is crap, try the wireless. You can get it on pre-paid. I thought it'd just be a "stop-gap" temporary thing, but it turned out to be heaps better than what I had (except for quota, I think I used to have more)

    EDIT: just did the test it says ping 122 download 18.81 upload 7.93
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  8. OP
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    Darko

    Darko Member

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    Thanks everyone for you input
     
  9. stevenx

    stevenx Member

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    It's pretty good! It's infinitely better than the 10/1 ADSL we used to have - it's faster, lower latency, and it doesn't shit the bed every time there's rain. The alternative is moving offices/home (not going to happen) or spending hundreds of thousands of dollars to run fibre up here (also not going to happen).

    Uniti have hinted over on Whirlpool that 100/40 (or better) residential plans will be announced within the next week or two.

    Because of past experiences overseas I was kind of sceptical about wireless at first, but this really has been a revelation. 100% recommend.

    I'm honestly unable to think of a compelling reason why I would ditch Uniti to switch to an NBN service, assuming that FTTN this time this year is still the same mess that it is now. My NBN experiences have not been great, and the Uniti equipment we have here is already capable of much more than 100/100. We're just not willing to pay for it - same as most people with gigabit NBN theoretically available.

    Edit: We run our business over this connection. Public IP's with primary web and mail servers (let alone the other stuff), office and domestic browsing, 10 or so people with multiple devices during business hours, file sharing to clients, voice, etc. No dramas. The big issue we had was when the entire state lost power a year ago - and that was because we ran out of battery power and it took all our servers down. We dug out a generator to put ourselves back online, and although we couldn't open the garage door we could connect to the Internet.
     
    Last edited: Oct 2, 2017
  10. Copie

    Copie Member

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    Problem is with wireless is lack of providers in most areas and limited coverage areas.

    Not to mention higher cost and if your renting the landlord might not want an antenna installed on the roof.
     
  11. wwwww

    wwwww Member

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    For using every now and then it's fine, but for an always-on connection, ask yourself have you ever had reliable wireless technology?
     
  12. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    I have. Can't you talk on your phone for as long as you want? That works for me, too.
     
  13. ir0nhide

    ir0nhide Member

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    I've heard reports that consumer class spectrum-based wireless isn't half bad from a performance point of view; perhaps the OP can test the water with NBN to see what their (chosen) ISP's contention is like during peak hours first.
     
  14. caspian

    caspian Member

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    you're right there, there's no argument - I am explaining to you.

    again, the speeds you quote are maximums, not service guarantees. did you find anything in your contract about that?

    whether you find it personally acceptable is neither here nor there. DSL is a best-effort technology, with a maximum performance bounded by what the technology can achieve, and generally a minimum that will be specified in your contract as what you're entitled to receive. anything between those two points is luck of the draw and can and will vary at any time.
     
  15. caspian

    caspian Member

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    a couple of problems there...

    CVC congestion is not the only factor potentially affecting peak hour performance with wireless. hardware capacity and frequency availability are also considerations that can't be controlled.

    second, you can't extrapolate from one isolated sample, because it isn't indicative of general conditions.

    if his works fine then I am happy for him.
     
  16. wwwww

    wwwww Member

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    On a mobile phone? You've never had drop outs or poor signal resulting in unclear voice?
     
  17. broccoli

    broccoli Member

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    Nope. But I don't use it a lot, so my experience might be influenced by that.
     
  18. perkz

    perkz Member

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    I'm also with Uniti Wireless. They're easily the best ISP I've been with - ever.

    I live in Port Melbourne. HFC from both Telstra and Optus run past my place, but neither of then wanted to connect me when we moved in. My place was new, and didn't have a phone line connected, so if I wanted DSL I'd have to pay some massively stupid fee for a phone line to be run.

    It was cheaper to get Uniti to stick a wireless bridge on my roof. Go figure.

    Uniti install one of these with a directional antenna onto a short mast on your roof: https://www.ubnt.com/airmax/nanostationm/

    I'm on their 50/10 plan. I can max that out no problem, any time of day.
    No issues with latency. Weather/wind etc doesn't effect it at all.

    I used to live in an apartment that had NBN FTTP. Even though I got 100/40, it was hard pressed to find an ISP that actually could consistently give you that. Especially for international traffic.
     
  19. bart5986

    bart5986 Member

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    Wireless as a technology most likely will never be very good compared to fibre.

    Its probably possible today in some areas to get a wireless connection that is fast and has ping that never goes above 10ms.

    However what you don't realise is that your wireless provider or the towers it uses created those towers with a lot more density in mind.

    If you want to see a real wireless connection, go to a high density area that uses a lot of wireless and you'll see the crazy amounts of congestion.

    The average person might not notice any issues on their Facebook etc.

    But its very noticeable in ping sensitive or services that require high amounts of sustained bandwidth.
     
  20. caspian

    caspian Member

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    I think it's possible to do wireless with good inherent bandwidth - it's just a matter of purchasing enough frequency spectrum to support enough parallel channels. that's the problem, spectrum is scarce and expensive, and you get into more expense when you need the hardware to support it.

    that's above and beyond issues of LOS, interference, weather fade, convenient antenna size etc.

    and then you need to upgrade the backhaul to the base station that is supplying the signal... multiple sites if you want a mobility solution, as opposed to a fixed one.
     

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