Wiring up a home

Discussion in 'Networking, Telephony & Internet' started by 5tumpy, Jul 30, 2012.

  1. 5tumpy

    5tumpy Member

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    Hey Guys,

    So my and wife and I are tossing up the idea of building a home, and doing all the sums... One of my not-negotiables is gigabit ethernet throughout the house, but I'm not sure what the best way to do it will be...

    I won't be doing anything intensive, so I'm thinking 1 port to each room and if I need more, chuck a gigabit switch in. Is this a viable plan? In the past, I've just used dumb switches for this purpose, I can't imagine this will require anything more than this? In the past, I've only had my study networked, and had wi-fi for the rest of the house, so I'm not 100% sure on the best method of attack...

    Anyone have any ideas roughly how much I'd be looking at to get a cabler to do the cable runs for me? Do I need to request that he tag the cables, or is this a given?

    Thanks guys!!
     
  2. mitsimonsta

    mitsimonsta Member

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    1st rule of cabling: Always run more cables than you think you need. If you think you only need one then run two. Even if you do not terminate it, at least it is in the walls.

    Number one prioroty is to think about TELEPHONE outlets. Where, how many. Remember that VoIP will be ubiquitous in 5 years, and if you still have Copper POTS then you can just patch it in wherever you want.

    Network next. I would immediately think 1 phone and one data outlet per bedroom would be required, so make it 3 outlets.

    Also think of other areas you may have forgotten: Fridge, Kitchen. Maybe even a couple of ports to the laundry - I expect that Internet connected washing machines will be out in the next 5 years, I shit you not.

    I'd be pumping 4 outlets to the TV area at a bare minimum, possibly more. Remember you can use extras to send video to 'other' locations in the house.

    You will need to pull it all to a central closet. Some people use the master bedroom wardrobe, I think a storage cupboard in the garage is a better idea. You will need at least two double GPO's in there, and at least a vent and possibly an extraction fan if you want to put a server or NAS in there. Remember that this is where your fibre termination will also probably go.

    Get a couple of 24-port patch panels in a small comms rack, and throw a decent switch in there, ideally something that can do VLANs.
     
  3. Sphinx2000

    Sphinx2000 Member

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    I would believe that iFridges and iWashing machines will be wireless, like TV's these days, so dont go too nuts with points..

    Have them lead all the network points back to a central patch panel in a small comms cabinet (usually top of the linen closet is a good spot), then you can install any switch, router, voip setup you want from that point (dont forget power in there too).

    Have your phone lines terminated there too, then you can patch them to where you want too, as well as straight in to routers, etc in your cabinet.. :thumbup:
     
  4. Pugs

    Pugs Member

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    http://www.overclockers.com.au/wiki/Specifying_a_New_House_Build_Or_Retro_Fit_Network_Install < read that and then come back if you need anymore help or ask any more questions

    budget up to $120 per run for a new build

    Mech----Cable---Mech < is a "run" but there will be added costs like conduiting and such which bump the price up abit. there are lots of sundry costs whcih are needed but don't really relate to the per run cost

    but of course never take a tech per run cost.. get a quote/'s
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  5. OP
    OP
    5tumpy

    5tumpy Member

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    Fair enough, makes sense...

    I thought about telephony, but the wife and I haven't used a home phone for 5 years, we use mobiles for everything...

    Yeah, I was thinking 1 data port per bedroom... So 2 ports going by your golden rule... As above telephony is redundant for us...

    Might put a port in the kitchen, depending on cost, but we won't be having anything internet enabled in there for the forseeable future, so not essential...

    TV's will have a media player each, and Foxtel, so yeah, 4 ports again seems to fit in...

    The networking gear will go in my study, either in the wardrobe or under my desk (I'll have a desk running around the wall of the 4mx3m room) wasn't expecting to need to run so much gear, but what you say makes sense... One thing there won't be a shortage of is GPO's... The house we've just sold had 1 single GPO in each room... It shitted me up the wall, even after I converted them all to doubles!

    Wow... That seems like mega-overkill to me... Any reason in particular I need all that gear? The patch panels I get, but I don't want to have to get a CCNA cert to look after my home network! :p

    What do you reckon I should budget for all this?

    Thanks for your help, mate!
     
  6. MrvNDMrtN

    MrvNDMrtN Member

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    I ran 10 cables and got my cabler(stowe australia) to terminate for me.

    I bought all the stuff for about $200.

    His time was a few hours.

    So $300 all up for 10 runs.

    While he was terminating i was running RG6 to the same points.

    Oh, i also had plenty of free spare cat6 and mechs from work that they were going to bin. All systimax branded.

    Problem with systimax is i had clipsal faceplates and needed adapter bezels which cost $35 for 10 pieces! What a rip..

    Least my house is all commercial standard :)
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  7. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Doesn't cost extra to run more cables. One port is never enough. Two as a minimum everywhere you plan to have a wall plate. In "shared" rooms such as a rumpus or living area, plan to have at least four ports, one plate of two ports on opposite corners of the room. You'll thank yourself later when you have your next LAN party.

    Unless you plan to run VLAN's, a managed switch is totally unnecessary. Just go with a regular garden-variety unmanaged 24 or 48 port switch and you'll be fine. Place the patch panel somewhere central in the house such as the garage or a broom wardrobe inside a small 4 or 6-unit rack (or a full-size 42-unit rack if you plan to kit it out).
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  8. OP
    OP
    5tumpy

    5tumpy Member

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    So, in terms of the cabinet and switch, will these suffice?

    Cabinet

    Switch

    If I fit them in the top of the wardrobe in my study, will I need anything special in terms of ventilation/cooling to prevent it overheating? Was thinking about putting it under my desk, but I just realised with the amount of cabling that's going to be coming into it, hidden will be a better option!

    My dad also has some rolls of ethernet cable at home in the garage, there's probably a couple of hundred metres of cable there, they're massive rolls, will have to check if they're cat 6 when I get home...
     
  9. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Both of those will be fine, but I highly suggest you put the rack in a place that is away from everything as it's not something you will come to or look at on a regular basis, hence the back corner of the garage or inside a wardrobe somewhere, otherwise the din of the fan in the network switch will slowly drive you mad.

    You also want the rack to be easily accessible so you can re-patch as required, but in such cases I recommend just buying a switch (or switches) with enough ports to have all ports enabled in your home so you don't have to re-patch anything ever.
     
    Last edited: Jul 31, 2012
  10. OP
    OP
    5tumpy

    5tumpy Member

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    Cool... Good stuff, top shelf of the wardrobe in my study it is then... Will it be ok in a closed wardrobe?

    Yeah, that's why I picked the 24 port, should be plenty! That's 2 ports for each bedroom (main doesn't really need any, I don't believe in doing anything in the bedroom except sleeping, rooting and dressing!) with 14 left over for the 2 lounge rooms and common areas, should do me I reckon, especially when you factor in the wireless network as well...

    Thanks for your help guys!!!
     
  11. HyRax1

    HyRax1 ¡Viva la Resolutión!

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    Yes it will.
     

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