Working with carbon fibre cloth?

Discussion in 'Modding' started by BloodDonor, Nov 12, 2006.

  1. BloodDonor

    BloodDonor Member

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    Ive nearly finished my design for a carbon fibre case :)


    However, id like to do research on working with it before i proceed :Paranoid:

    Anyone know any guides? ive googled for some, and have had little joy
     
  2. AussieJester

    AussieJester Member

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    Theres a thread 11 down from the one you posted asking about info on Carbon fibre has a link in it to a forum that might be of use http://forums.overclockers.com.au/showthread.php?t=522521
     
  3. wahoo84

    wahoo84 Member

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    All I can say is... expensive, and time consuming... for you to be able to produce a "good" quality CF product you will require the following...

    CF usually comes in sheets either pre-preg or other forms. What you do is lay it out layer by layer until the required thickness and layer orientation for strength is met. You then have to clamp it down, or at least some how mould it to a pre made mould and then stick it into an oven to cure it. After that you may want to machine it a little to fix up the shape etc, but CF is very brittle and once cured/formed it cannot be reformed... expensive work mate.

    The most important part is probably the layer orientation you have to consider when stacking up the sheets of CF. This is because CF is only strong in the unilateral direction of the fibres (ie. length-wise so to say) and so you need to orient the layers like say 0 degrees, 90, -45, 45, 45, -45, 90, 0... and so on but in your case the structure you're making shouldn't require you to consider the "strength" properties too much...

    The main reason people use CF is because of its lightness and also its strength. If you're going purely for looks you're probably better off getting someone to make a fibreglass mould/shell for you and doing a paintjob to make it look like CF.

    ~wahoo
     
  4. 2xCPU

    2xCPU Member

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    What wahoo84 says is basically right, but if your not going to race it, the easiest way is to use CF mat exactly as you would for fibre glass using the same polyester resin as used for fibre glass.
    This will not be as strong as wahoo84's method, but is much more practical for playing at home.

    2.
     
  5. TERRA Operative

    TERRA Operative Member

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    You can also build out of fibreglass and then do the last layer as carbon.
    It's damn expensive at the moment due to Airbus and Boeing... A full carbon bonnet is worth a mint in parts at the moment.... :upset:
     
  6. AussieJester

    AussieJester Member

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    If your using a mould first layer carbon fibre :)
     
  7. iAl3xi

    iAl3xi (Banned or Deleted)

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    why not make a formula one car insted? only a few bux more for engine and stuff
     
  8. Stygian Shane

    Stygian Shane Member

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    Don't know if you've seen it, but I have a worklog for the fabrication of a carbon fibre case here.

    I strongly recommend you see a composites dealer and get advice from them on how to do it; I also recommend using a core of balsawood/3mm MDF and then laminate 1 or 2 layers of CF on the top of them, as I did. Cuts costs to a HUGE degree, as you only have to use a fraction of CF and epoxy.

    I'm not sure whether you're planning to vacuum bag or press it, but that is the sorta stuff to discuss with someone who works with composites.

    EDIT: And an AWESOME guide, which I relied on quite heavily, is here.
     
  9. blakeyboysmith

    blakeyboysmith Member

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    don't bother with pre-preg it costs a shit load because we don't make it out here and it needs to be kept cool during storage.

    so that means wet layups just like you would with fibreglass.
    excpt you use different resins.

    depending on what your after in terms of properties... not much really.
    a simple wet layup and air cure will be fine. so don't stress about vac bagging and oven cures... its not worth the cost.

    your plies have to be even in a layup or else you will get residual stress.
    but if you use woven cloth that is no longer a concern

    i think you should be able to get away with plain weave with room temp cure epoxy.

    "competition car composites" i will track down the author later id very good practical approach.

    if you really want i can send you the introductory paper i wrote on Composites.
     
  10. OP
    OP
    BloodDonor

    BloodDonor Member

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    thanks for the info guys :)
     

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