Worklog: Massively (Update #65, 29th Nov – Final Pics + Aussie copper pipe fittings!)

Discussion in 'Modding Worklogs' started by Saate, Mar 29, 2012.

  1. WishBone17

    WishBone17 Member

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    What do you do for a living.

    Let me guess. Architect, construction? project management?
     
  2. OP
    OP
    Saate

    Saate Member

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    Hah, I take that as a high compliment :) All the stuff in this worklog is truly first time for me, though, and I'm learning as I go - before starting this build my collection of tools consisted of an orange IKEA kit with a hammer and screwdriver inside :p The drafting stuff is done using the free Solid Edge software that I've picked up thanks to the [awesome guide] that Bastard Child wrote. It's not too difficult to use and as you can see the results look pretty professional!

    I head up IT and Software Support in my current job, been here for 3 years since we moved to Canberra. Before that I worked entirely in call centres around Sydney for 10 years, initially on the phones and later in management roles. Worked for a big call centre outsourcer (Teletech) for most of that time - Nokia, Bigpond and Aussie Home Loans were the key companies I worked for over 8 years - and just before the move I worked in the big TAB call centre in Granville. So nah, no professional experience informing this build - just google fu and patience to learn :p
     
  3. CaidsTech

    CaidsTech Member

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    You should use this thread as a reference on your CV..

    I'd hire you. :lol:
     
  4. OP
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    Saate

    Saate Member

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    I should be able to use Scarab Lord on my CV too, but nooooo they say! :p
     
  5. WishBone17

    WishBone17 Member

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    haha fair enough, just all the cad work and planning, you seem like someone thats pretty organised.

    I work in Management (print management) and my organisation skills outside of work is about is good as the Greek Economy. LOL
     
  6. D_MaN

    D_MaN Member

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    +1

    Your skills seem legendary!
    Everything look really professional. Even you photo shots :D
     
  7. Reaper_1994

    Reaper_1994 Member

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  8. oculi

    oculi Member

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    that looks kinda rough, depends on how fast you did it i guess.

    have you considered getting these bits laser (maybe, can;t cut all plastics and edge quality might be poor) or waterjet cut? if you can output to .dxf (from memory) they should be able to cut from your CAD very easily.

    If you want to go with hand cutting i'd suggest getting a few good files to straighten up/smooth the edges, there should be a fair bit of information on cutting perspex. you could even buff the edges if you felt like it.
     
  9. OP
    OP
    Saate

    Saate Member

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    Yeah definitely rough, was just a practice run to get used to the new scroll saw and the cutting process in general :) had a delivery of proper acrylics come in on Friday so will be using those for proper goes! Also read a hand tip that suggested printing the designs on A4 label sheets to cut out and stick on the acrylic film which should work great. The file suggestion is good, was thinking of similar - any ideas what kind of file would be best?

    If I'm not happy with the quality of my own results they'll absolutely go to laser cutter :)
     
  10. OP
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    Saate

    Saate Member

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    Awesome, very cool! Thanks mate :)
     
  11. Eject

    Eject Member

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    Only if you are hoping for many sexual services from me in exchange for the account :p

    An I agree, nice work for a first time :) Looking good :)
     
  12. D_W_Y

    D_W_Y Member

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    if he was he wouldn't be amazed at the ability of drafting software lol. my favorite part is when you whip out solid edge and sketch some stuff. you should consider giving autocad a go but it costs money, unless you didn't pay for solid edge either :-D

    autodesk(that makes autocad) also makes a program called inventor which I use all the time, http://usa.autodesk.com/autodesk-inventor/
    there appears to be a free trial, but its basically incredible 3d modelling software I learnt to use in high school and I still use in uni and practice.
     
  13. OP
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    Saate

    Saate Member

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    I'm sure we could arrange something :p Thanks mate :)

    Hah yes, definitely a newb to this stuff - I grabbed Solid Edge because its free and the guide I read here was pretty comprehensive. If CAD is as easy to pick up it might be worth having a look at too - it certainly would make sending DXF/whatever files directly instead of having to convert them. With that said, Solid Edge seems to do a good job at helping me prototype so maybe I'll wait until next builds to hurt my head with CAD? we'll see :)
     
  14. D_MaN

    D_MaN Member

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    Ahh, I'm very keen for an update
     
  15. OP
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    Saate

    Saate Member

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    UPDATE - Acrylic, Midplate Work

    Hey folks! Has been a busy weekend for me, working entirely on the build so I have a LOT of catching up to do worklog wise. Last weekend I took 180 shots of work I did as well, and then another 280 shots this weekend. Have just finished post-processing and uploading so time to get stuck into story-time eh? :)

    Firstly, I picked up a 3TB drive for $164 including postage which was pretty amazing. Was a special via dealsdirect and couldnt resist:

    [​IMG]

    My acrylic order arrived, the stuff looks so great and photographs really well. Here's the order and a few shots of the acrylic:

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    I'm still waiting on an official response from Laing Thermotech regarding the pump orientation, my contact in their Aussie office has been a top bloke though and is keeping me updated on the wait. The Koolance tech guys have told me in specific terms that the inlet-down orientation is workable, and provided good insight on some of the concerns raised by people earlier. I'm now comfortable with proceeding with it this way but will wait for the response from Laing before I post all the info - I'll need time to digest it first and draft up a "Right to say I told you so" document for Creekin and Moptimus :)

    The midplate will have a 3mm acrylic cover attached to the top of it so I made some modifications to allow the pump + bulkhead fittings to connect through:

    [​IMG]

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    I couldnt figure out an easy way to cut the new bulkhead fitting holes, I don't have a proper drill (just my dremel) and I'm not sure how available hole saws are for metal? I decided to use one of my worn-down dremel cutting discs and did it the slow way:

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    Looks really rough, right? but never fear - turned out perfectly after a little attention from the sanding barrels:

    [​IMG]

    [​IMG]

    I'll show you what I've done with the hotswap bay tomorrow :)
     
  16. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Member

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    AARGH, the metal torture!! :p

    Get yourself a good set of Sutton Gamflex holesaws and arbors (if you're feeling flush) or a set of step-drills. Plus a good quality HSS metric bit set. And some kind of drill to put them in, obviously!

    Essential tools for the arsenal. :D
     
    Last edited: Jul 2, 2012
  17. OP
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    Saate

    Saate Member

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    Thanks mate, the step drill set looks worthy of the job! Are there limits on the metal thickness with those bits? The main thing thatd hold me back is my preference for a full bench type of setup, and I don't really have the space for that kinda thing. Are there bench mounts that can hold a normal drill to give me some flexibility?
     
  18. Creekin

    Creekin (Taking a Break)

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    notholdingmybreath.jpg :p

    what did the KL guy say? just discussing it on im with gingerraven
    have nfi what it will do really but just seems wrong on so many levels
    the impeller wont be sitting on the bearing correctly..i think it will be sitting on a layer of water, and probably reduce the volume of water the impeller can grab, significantly..and therefore the flow...
    also think that the impeller may jump up and down on the bearing more without gravity holding it down at all..and that may chip the bearing
    not to mention priming it..glwt
    sure it may work..just seems like a fast way to kill a pump..and expect laing to agree :Pirate:
     
  19. BlueRaven

    BlueRaven Member

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    Most are suitable for up to around 3mm steel, fine for case modding work. Using cutting oil is definitely advised for heavier-gauge material.

    Not sure about a bench mount for a hand drill, but surely such things must exist.

    There are some quite compact drill-press units around, but probably a bit of overkill until you start getting into fabbing up full custom cases and the like.
     
  20. OP
    OP
    Saate

    Saate Member

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    Just to clarify, you know the 'right to say I told you so' thing I mentioned was to formally confer that right upon you when it breaks yeah? :) all the advice I get from you guys is sage to me, I'm the newb so it's always appreciated! ok, so the initial response from KL was:

    > ----- Original Message ----- From: <tech@koolance.com>
    > To: "Matthew" <matthew@telstra.com>
    > Sent: Wednesday, May 30, 2012 2:10 AM
    > Subject: Re: [KOOLANCE.COM] After-Sales Tech Support
    >
    >
    >> Hello,
    >>
    >> It's more difficult to bleed with an upside down orientation. If you*
    >> can get the air completely out of the pump (tilting the case, or*
    >> whatever you need), it should be fine. If bled correctly (all of the*
    >> air is out of the loop), there's no chance of air getting stuck in*
    >> the pump. It may require a lot of attention at first, as air bubbles*
    >> will be stuck in the radiator, and other places.
    >>
    >> Thanks,
    >>
    >> Koolance Technical Support


    Then I replied to specifically ask about an issue you mentioned:

    > I can definitely come up with solutions to bleed the air, already*
    > thinking something like a hinged mount so that I can run the pump in*
    > the sideways orientation while bleeding and then move it into position*
    > after the loop is clean and established. One other thing I wanted to*
    > check with you - someone in the worklog commented:
    >
    > "thats about the only orientation thats not good...the impeller sits*
    > on a ceramic bearing, magnetic force holds it there but it only*
    > supports from the bottom and sides, not the top. so upside down its*
    > just hanging. "
    >
    > Do you know if this is something I need to be concerned about? or*
    > again is it just a case of making sure it runs wet and it should be*
    > fine? I've spent the day reading all the different Laing d5/pmp-450*
    > manuals I could find and couldnt find anything on the magnetic*
    > force/bearing issue mentioned.
    >
    > Any ideas or comments would be appreciated,


    and got this back:

    Hello,

    It's magnetic, even upside down, it will be sitting on the bearing.*
    Rather than thinking of it sitting on the bearing (because of gravity),*
    realize that the bearing is more of a way to stop the impeller from*
    getting too close to the impeller housing. The magnetic force is much*
    much greater than gravity, this is why it wouldn't be hanging, even*
    upside down. Air bubbles while it's upside down though, are going to be*
    tough to notice. I think that's the biggest concern. If you take apart*
    your pump, you can pull off the impeller to see how magnetic it actually is.

    Thanks,

    Koolance Technical Support


    So I still wanted (and want) something from Laing themselves too, but at this stage I can handle being careful to bleed air initially and can wear the potential of shorter lifespan if it comes to it. All things in time, though, I'll wait to see what Laing say just the same!
     

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