Workplace IDE poll

Discussion in 'Programming & Software Development' started by jaredoconnor, Mar 23, 2009.

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Which IDE do you do the majority of your work in, at your workplace?

  1. Eclipse or Eclipse-based

    27 vote(s)
    20.8%
  2. NetBeans

    6 vote(s)
    4.6%
  3. Visual Studio or Express editions

    67 vote(s)
    51.5%
  4. Other

    30 vote(s)
    23.1%
  1. ACodingFettish

    ACodingFettish Member

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    That text editor with plugins for debugging, compiling etc is an IDE, not the text editor alone.

    And there is alot of things visual studio has over that(otherwise no one would pay for visual studio), but that's not the point of the thread.

    If your workplace requires you use vi/Notepad++ with plugins, thats fine, post it. But what generally happens in these threads is just like that xkcd comic, people try to sound hardcore, when really if you aren't using the right tools your just wasting your own time.
     
  2. grs1961

    grs1961 Member

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    Precisely.

    Those of us who work in an environment where an IDE such as Eclipse/Netbeans/Visual Studio is a simple mistake, often get it forced on us by luser^Wmisguided managers (Yes, Virginia, once I worked in a primarily UNIX environment where a manager told us that we had to standardise on Visual Studio for all our development, he didn't last long).

    Edit(vi/vim/gvim/emacs/xemacs)/make/reboot is pretty much de-riguer when you are doing kernel or driver development, and in an embedded environment, add in burn-to-PROM or equivalent.

    For single target user-level applications, an all-in-one IDE can be very useful, providing it works they way you do, rather than force you to work the way it wants.

    My editor (vim/gvim) works they way I want it to on Solaris, HP-UX, AIX, Tru64, OpenVMS, Linuxen, Windows, ...

    Make works across all the above (well, nmake on Windows).

    Okay, I use dbx/wildebeest/xdb/gdb/Visual Studio/Nu Sphere as appropriate to debug stuff when applicable.

    An IDE is a state of mind, more than simply a piece of software. IOW - crap code comes out of IDEs at least as often as discrete environments - cynical as I am, I'd say more often, because all-in-one IDEs make it easier to produce crap.
     
  3. Bradzac

    Bradzac Member

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    WTF? Fuck there are some idiots out there.
     
  4. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    u lucky SOB...
     
  5. adante

    adante Member

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    ffs yeah text editors are just as functional as IDE's. Infact, morse keyers are just as functional. One of the best examples is this is italian dual keyer:

    [​IMG]

    Personally I like to hack lewnix kernel code by using my penis to key commands directly to a custom vim serial interface (when I use the dual keyer above I also use my left nut).

    Now tell me what has Visual Studio has over that?
     
  6. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Would be more effective then using Visual Studio for the task.

    Better yet load Visual Studio up on one of the UNIX's or Linux... oh wait you can't, so your logic that Visual Studio is better then Vi/m or Emacs is lost in that environment. Just because Visual Studio is the correct tool for your requirements doesn't make it the correct tool for everyone else, nor does it make it the best tool.

    PS I can use Vi/m or Emacs on Windows... I win.
     
  7. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    if there were a unix or linux version it would be better than your options. unfortunately you will have to live without :(
     
  8. adante

    adante Member

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    calm down. Either you are reading too much into what I said or are insane. I never made the claim either in plain english nor formal logic that Visual Studio was better than Vi/m or Emacs.

    Having seem some of the guys at work hack with vim/emacs I have much respect for them, and know my way around both, but they are not for me (not yet anyway).

    But if someone throws up a screenshot of NPP in dual pane mode and then puts out a challenge asking what visual studio has over that - yeah I'm going to take the mick out of that.

    Congratulations on your win though.
     
  9. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Thanks :D
    Me fired up, never! Just hate these discussions where everyone defends their IDE like Highlander, "There can only be one!", when their can be many, as there are many tasks and requirements for a IDE.

    Because I work in a non GUI environment, mine is satisfied by using Vi/M.
     
  10. g4n0n

    g4n0n Member

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    mvim + bufexplorer + some custom scripts

    90% Python, 10% C, targeting Linux
     
  11. martin_t

    martin_t Member

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    IDE I use at work

    I use UltraEdit at work to edit embedded C code.
     
  12. BigM

    BigM Member

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    Eclipse with some plugins....

    Even THE most hardcore VI dude in the universe (and our team) eventually (after months :lol:) admitted Eclipse was better for what we were doing. I think the main win was using subclipse to connect to SVN... That really is handy!

    Code completion is also nice, especially if you're using a framework with oodles of classes.
     
  13. Dedge

    Dedge Member

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    Our workplace doesn't mandate any specific platform or tools. Our Java guys use Eclipse, and the Ruby guys use TextMate. I think one of the Rubyists has recently picked up RubyMine (IntelliJ).
     
  14. majikshoe

    majikshoe Member

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    We get a choice between Eclipse and IntelliJ IDEA 8.1 for our Java/Groovy work. Given the choice, I choose IntelliJ over IDEA, it just feels more polished. Ain't free though, so I'd be picking Eclipse if I was the one paying :D
     
  15. trickma

    trickma Member

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    I don't know how you vim/vi users can do it to yourselves :p
     
  16. SkiNLaB

    SkiNLaB Member

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    Not that I do much coding these days, but most of us use phpEd. Absolutely no encouragement to code in a particular IDE though, you can use whatever floats your boat.

    - Scott
     
  17. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    Well when I stated coding in 1979 you had line editors on the ZX80, TRS80 and C64 before in 1983 I stated coding on mainframes and UNIX where I used vi. Now 25years later and still on UNIX based systems in a non GUI world, Vi/m still is the best tool for the environment.

    EDIT yes I know C64 came out in 1983, I still needed to play games and write code at home. :)
     
  18. Luke212

    Luke212 Member

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    the same editor after 25 years. tells me just how stale and un-inventive your work environment is.
     
  19. teegman

    teegman Member

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    And computers run on the same 0's and 1's after all these years..

    Editors / IDE's are a means to an end, if you're used to a particular work flow then it's silly to invest time learning a new environment unless there's realistic potential for significant improvement in productivity.
     
  20. GumbyNoTalent

    GumbyNoTalent Member

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    I also still use TCP/IP. :D

    You'd be surprised as to how full circle IT has gone in the last 25 years, especially broad concepts. Anyway, Vi hasn't been stale nor have the scripting languages Bash and Perl. And just because I use Vi as my editor/IDE (once I have plugins) doesn't make my work stale, after all it is just a tool to product code.
     

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