Your biggest potato moment building a PC?

Discussion in 'Overclocking & Hardware' started by StreekG, Oct 2, 2017.

  1. cowboyjai

    cowboyjai Member

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    Probably biggest thing that comes to mind was moving working internals from one case to the other and somehow frying the mobo.

    Didn't do anything out of the ordinary, didn't mess anything up, the mobo just would not post in there. Think I pulled it out thinking it might have been a short but that PC never lived again. Maybe static electricity discharge? I honestly only thought that was an urban legend but now I'm a believer.
     
  2. Skitz0

    Skitz0 Member

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    oh god so many potato moments building PCs while growing up in the late 90s / early 2000s.

    The first one which comes to mind is buying a Creative Soundblaster PCI sound card with all of my savings for a upgrade from the integrated mobo sound.
    It wasn't the first time I had installed a PCI card but I obviously was too keen on getting the machine running and didn't seat the card properly.
    What followed was 2 hours of swearing, anger and crying. Finally I figured out what I had done wrong and luckily I only fried the card and not the motherboard.

    Coming in at a close second was me putting the jumper in the wrong location (limit drive capacity) on a HDD which effectively corrupted a heap of data on the drive.
    That was also a fun night.

    .....why the hell do we even bother.... :wired: :tired:
     
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  3. ShaggyMoose

    ShaggyMoose Member

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    I can't think of any RAM that would actually fit in backwards, given they have uneven pinouts? You must have really wanted to get that in there!
     
  4. MR CHILLED

    MR CHILLED D'oh!

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    I agree, how on earth do you actually get it in there?? I've done it by accident before but quickly realise it's around the wrong way. Even if I wanted to ram it in by force it's never going to go in.
     
  5. elvis

    elvis Old school old fool

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    You'd think, right? I can only assume the plastic restrictors were worn right down.

    It was quite an old mobo/CPU combo. In fact, I'm pretty sure it was used by me for years, given to someone else for a while, and then returned. I was building a MAME cabinet out of it, so it got pulled out of the spare parts bin.

    Either way, ultra potato moment on my behalf.
     
  6. bennyg

    bennyg Member

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    A long time ago on a P4 board I was pressing down on a very stiff northbridge heatsink spring-loaded retention arm, screwdriver slipped, gouged off a tiny resistor. I "stuck" it back on with AS5, why I chose that I have absolutely no idea... but it at least worked, after I shifted the primary harddrive to another SATA port.


    Just removed the CPU from LGA socket on laptop motherboard. Background thing I was listening to on youtube finishes, I spin around on the chair, stub my toe on the cabinet, knock a screwdriver off a high shelf and it drops point first right into the exposed socket... broken pin. A littany of stuffups, screwarounds, delays and busted replacements... a $300 socket repair (yep the mobo is worth much more than that) and it finally worked again 7 months later. Then I went to liquid metal the CPU for the guy interested in buying it off me... while disassembled, the supplementary PCB the power button is on (i.e. important) slips off the top of the pile of parts it was sitting on top of on my desk, and not realising, I move my chair roller right over it and cleave it in twain... hellooooo another month delay.

    That message to clean up and organise my study just keeps on not getting through...


    Most recently, I'm trying to solder a copper pipe on to a combined CPU/slave GPU heatsink (8 heatpipes, two heatplates, 3 radiators all up in a very contorted confined setup) for the watercooled laptop mod... didn't have enough clips and the whole heatsink completely falls apart on me, ruining an hour of careful alignment work. Getting two heatplates to sit perfectly flat and level on two dies ~10cm apart, while all completely rigid and fixed together is haaaaaaard.
     
    Last edited: Jan 31, 2018
  7. Sillen

    Sillen Member

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    First new PC post Pentium Pro 200 was Socket A MSI KT3 Ultra2 with AMD Athlon Palomino XP-1800+(crayon and defrost pen ). Went through some Thoroughbred and Barton XP-M came along (I get confused in my old age) and as the ABIT NF7-S was the o/c champ little bit later was swapping out mobo's when I forgot that I had put my Ti4400 on the office chair and so sat down on the chair. Card was cooked (crushed). Had to go out and get a Radeon 9800 Pro $695 :thumbup:

    (Not long after, Corsair TWINX1024-3700LL with Eva's favourite BH5 chips :D )
     
  8. philos

    philos Member

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    Here's mine from 1982.

    In 1981, I built my first S100 computer. Just 4 slots. The power supply used a transformer, bridge rectifier and a 10,000 microfarad capacitor (on the 8 volt line). Just for fun, I put a 0.5 amp fuse on the mains side. It worked fine.

    The upgrade path was to change to a 10 slot motherboard and add capacitors for the +16 volt and -16 volt lines. This included a 30,000 microfarad capacitor for the 8 volt line.

    I turned it on and the fuse blew. I put another in and it blew too. I went to the local supermarket and purchased a lamp socket and a 100 W bulb. I wired the bulb in place of the fuse and turned it on.

    Anyone want to guess?

    The bulb turned on and slowly turned off. The power supply to the motherboard was fine and the computer worked.

    The "potato moment" is that the extra capacitors acted as a bottomless pit for a fraction of a second. The bulb limits the current draw when the tungsten wire glows.

    So, I put a 1 amp fuse in and had no further problems.
     
  9. t0mn8r

    t0mn8r Member

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    My potato...

    Brand new high end Opteron Build. All the best bits as it was a system I built for a customer.

    When trying to boot it the system would start and then shut down immediately. No matter what I did. Took the whole thing apart and carefully put it together again. Yes, all the bits were in the right place.

    Same result. Had to take it to the supplier who informed me 2 days later that there was a mounting screw on the case shorting out the motherboard.

    Blehhh...
     
  10. terroristone

    terroristone Member

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    I’ve pulled apart and built my system so many times (with water cooling and sometimes phase charging) drunk as and never had a issue, done grunt overclocks to get high score with hard mods on video cards and never had a issue. It’s the simple things that get us every time.
     
  11. LordMordred

    LordMordred Member

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    Doing a build for a school a few years back (approx 100 PC's - all the same), built all the PC's, started standing them up to run some mPrime burn in and quite a few of them wouldn't POST. Checked these ones over and over again; it took ages! Figured the mobo's must be faulty so started tearing them down and realised I hadn't put the CPU's in, just the heatsinks straight on the socket.... cabbage.
     
  12. ShaggyMoose

    ShaggyMoose Member

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    <Mortal Kombat voice>ULTRA POTATO</Mortal Kombat voice> :D
     
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  13. pantner

    pantner Member

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    Had almost the same thing...

    Upgrading my HTPC, I think I was changing the case.
    Had a nice DFI mATX board with onboard GFX and put a raiser in the wrong place, shorted out the board :(

    Also had one when I working in retail.

    Customer came in and bought all these parts for a new build. AMD 2500+ Socket A days.
    Decided not to wait for his friend to come over to help and built it himself.
    Emptied an entire tube of thermal paste onto the CPU before installing the heatsink.
    It went EVERYWHERE.
    And he wondered why it didn't POST :p
     
  14. MaxYenda

    MaxYenda Member

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    My big moment was putting a after market cooler on a GPU, as the screws were to big, I drilled the board.
    Learn a lot that day, about $400 worth.
     
  15. hawks667

    hawks667 Member

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    Swapped out a graphic card the other day on one of by testing boxes....Put the new card in...no display......put the old card in, no display. Tried another PSU, no display. Swapped out RAM, no display...tested both cards, RAM & PSU on another PC, all working....somehow i killed the mobo, tried bios reset, nope...no visible damage, no magical smoke released.....go figure...
     
  16. amsaim

    amsaim Member

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    Bought one of those fancy Athlon XP 3200+ back in the day. Bought a new heatsink to cool it down but didn't quite get the mounting right. Walked away just as I turned it on and came back an hour later to the good old burn/melting smell. tried everything to revive it but had to accept its fate.

    Showed it off to all my mates that I am going to turn it into an expensive keyring, rubbing/touching and throwing it. 3 weeks later I am thinking..... maybe give it one more crack in the motherboard.... Bloody thing turned on and lasted till I got Athlon 64 x2 :D:D:D
     
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  17. TaXy DriVar

    TaXy DriVar Member

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    Only potato moment that comes to mind is doing work experience in 1997. Was building a new PC in a computer shop. Was just about complete with the build, Pentium 166-200 desktop days, and last to install was the FDD. For some reason was met with resistance installing the cable on the board. Applied a bit more force and heard a "CRACK".

    Thought, OH SHIT. Looked up, boss didnt seem to notice. Pulled cable back out and realised the ribbon cable had one of the holes filled in where the pin would go. Looked down and I had pushed one of the FDD pins straight through the back of the board.

    Quickly found and installed the correct ribbon cable. Powered up the PC and all seemed fine, booted from the Windows 98 FDD Boot disk. To this day I have no idea if it ever came back for repair.
     
  18. ShaggyMoose

    ShaggyMoose Member

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    Usually the mounting holes on the motherboard are fairly isolated from the traces. I would have thought you could expand the holes a little without trashing it? Drilling completely new holes is probably not a great idea though...
     
  19. MaxYenda

    MaxYenda Member

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    Wrong board, it was the GPU i drilled
     
  20. pwlm1975

    pwlm1975 Member

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    I replaced a crappy old Acer PSU with a schmick Silverstone one about 8 years ago. Would not boot, no lights, no nothing. Reseated everything, replaced power cable, eventually pulled the whole thing apart and rebuilt it to no avail.

    Then, I decided to read the manual.

    Then, I saw the PSU had a separate power on/off switch...
     
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